101 Dalmatians

101 Dalmatians

The Live action adaptation of a Disney Classic. When a litter of dalmatian puppies are abducted by the minions of Cruella De Vil, the parents must find them before she uses them for a diabolical fashion statement.

A woman kidnaps puppies to kill them for their fur, but various animals then gang up against her and get their revenge in slapstick fashion. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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101 Dalmatians torrent reviews

Stephen D (ca) wrote: Stunk...don't even have words to describe why. it's so bad

Jacob B (jp) wrote: Well... basically a waste of time... basically D-/F+...

Angie S (ca) wrote: So far fetched. That is what movies are though.

Xavier P (es) wrote: When it comes to comedy I like my films to be where you leave your brain at the door. The movies pacing and story-telling is somewhat a stream of consciousness where the writer seems to throw in stuff as he's thinking of it. There are some funny moments like watching the Mixon brothers discuss their favorite porn movies. There's also a funny character played by Twilight star Jackson Rathbone named Snippy. The actual story is all over the place but I don't mind that because its basically a party movie. Larry Miller does a fine performance and it's great to see him play a dirty principal. I recommend it. But please leave your brain at the door.

Christopher B (au) wrote: Good horror film. You've seen it all before, but if your like me, when has that ever stopped you from enjoying something? But enough with the shaky camera already!

Camille L (us) wrote: Ce n'est pas que First Knight soit un si mauvais film, c'est juste qu'il est largement oubliable, jamais vraiment epique, realise de maniere impersonnelle par un Jerry Zucker qui sortait de Ghost et mis en musique sans genie. S'il n'y a rien a redire sur la performance de Julia Ormond et Sean Connery, Richard Gere est absolument catastrophique.

Dan M (au) wrote: Reviewing this as a kid, I'd probably give it four and a half or even five stars. As an adult, ehh... I know it's on the sillier side of the Christmas movie spectrum(it is an Ernest movie afterall) so you have to forgive a lot of the wacky shenanigans that happen here. Nostalgia factor included, I put it in between a four and a half rating and the mess that is Master of Disguise, the worst comedy of all time, so... average it is.

Li R (ru) wrote: Watching this with TJ and Curt. Oh the places you'll go, floppy discs and dial up modems!!

John A (us) wrote: A Powerful Film About Racism, Director Samuel Fuller's White Dog Is A Tale About Trying To Overcome A Dog's Racist Views.Lucy (Kirsty McNichol),Accidentally Hits A German Shepherd With Her Car, & Nurses It Back To Health. Later Events Occur And Lucy Discovers The Shocking Truth That Her New Best Friend, Is A White Dog, Trained By A Racist To Attack Black Skinned People On Sight. Lucy Finds An Animal Trainer, Carruthers (Burl Ives), Who Strongly Suggests That This Dog Should Be Put Down & Quick, Before Anyone Else Gets Hurt. But His Partner, Keys (Paul Winfield), A Maverick Black Animal Trainer, Steps In To Attempt To Recondition The Dog, But Sadly His Attempts Before With A White Dog Have Never Succeeded, Can This Be His Breakthrough?Director Samuel Fuller, Gives Great Direction To A Great Story, & With It's Excellent Script And Cast Performances It's Not A Film You Can Find Flaws In Easily. The Score Is Excellent As Always From Italian Film Composer Ennio Morricone. A Great Script Also Comes Into Play, And The Excellent Basic Plot Makes The Film Entertaining As It's Easy To Understand And Strives To It's Full Potential.

Carolyn W (mx) wrote: I think I need to watch it again...

Knox M (mx) wrote: Think about it. Bette Davis is the new cinema. Joan Crawford is the silent age. This film is the most revealing expos of Hollywood you'll ever see.

Kevin N (au) wrote: An undeniable masterpiece and one of the most elegantly conceived French films of all time. Max Ophuls was one of the great camera orchestrators, one who could make his machine's movements so graceful and fluid that his audience was able to forget they were watching a film and be swept away in both the joys and the tragedies of his characters and their drama. Here he is helped along on the other side of the lens by three awe-inspiring actors- Danielle Darrieux and her two admirers, Charles Boyer and the great Italian director and sometime actor Vittorio De Sica. There is a great tension between Boyer and De Sica, an electricity that can only be achieved by two great actors who know how to feel and not just what to say. It is perhaps their interaction more than any other in the film that I found myself so compelled by, an intense hatred for one another concealed to all except them and us by a dense bourgeois tranquility. This is an interesting story, but it is one that is made exceptional by Ophuls' exquisite storytelling. It's a slow burn style that always puts the audience one step ahead of the characters so as to maximize the drama of the story. It allows us to explore, always, and never settles on one person or setting too long. It is moving and involving, and it is ultimately responsible for the crushing weight the film eventually lays on us. The story of Madame De... is one that stings immediately but haunts long after.

Cort J (mx) wrote: Overated piece of shit.....crazed stalker lady pines for slime-ball piano player in 1900 Vienna ....slow as well

Neil O (gb) wrote: Alison Skipworth and W.C. Fields play Tillie and Augustus Winterbottom, a husband-and-wife team of con artists. The larcenous couple is summoned to a small town by their niece (Jacqueline Wells) and her husband (Clifford Jones) when the niece's father dies. Hoping for a sizeable inheritance, Tillie and Gus discover that the legacy consists of one rundown ferry boat. This is a rarely seen Fields movie that is very, very good. W.C.'s scene of mixing paint is a must see, it's classic Field's. It may not be in the same league as "It's a Gift" or "The Bank Dick," but it nevertheless offers a virtually nonstop barrage of wonderfully comedic scenes from start to finish. Fields and Alison Skipworth were a perfect cinematic match.

Sylvester K (ag) wrote: Saw VI is an even worse attempt than Saw V, the story was very forced though the new traps were somewhat interesting.

Axie T (es) wrote: No. Spoilers below, but they barely warrant a warning; if you're paying any kind of attention then you know what's going to happen well before you see any of it. The gushing sentimentality would be warranted if there were a shred of depth behind it. The best scenes are when the movie attempts to tackle something mundane and everyday, those feel natural and real; the rest is just an endless slew of cliches. Freeman tries but he doesn't have much to work with, his character would have been much more interesting if the movie gave his feelings and struggles with his disabled state any screentime at all. He woos the cardboard cut out mother character with a children's book without the slightest nuance or personal relevance or significance, and has to teach an imaginative child about imagination (at the girl's insistence and a $34.18 pricetag). The only conflict in the movie is entirely contrived, sharply out of character, and easily dismissed. Humor comes either from tired gags or at the expense of a mentally challenged boy. Literally nothing in the movie is genuine and unless you like your characters one-dimensional and your plot free of craps to give, you'll probably be more frustrated at the wasted potential than anything.

Jane B (it) wrote: I had forgotten what a wonderful movie this is. Leonardo DeCaprio and Johnny Depp were so great together. Watching it again reminds me of Mom. She sure liked this one.

Chris C (fr) wrote: Provocatively thrilling and erotic, Wild Things delivers plot twists that entertains and keeps you guessing along with stellar performances by Kevin Bacon, Matt Dillon, Neve Campbell and Bill Murray.

Giorgio P (nl) wrote: Classic British cinema. Dirty cinematography and unforgettable performances with real and well directed dialogue.