3 minutos

3 minutos

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  • Rating:
    4.00 out of 5
  • Length:0 minutes
  • Release:2004
  • Language:Spanish
  • Reference:Imdb
  • Keywords:3 minutos 2004 full movies, 3 minutos torrents movie

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3 minutos torrent reviews

Greg W (mx) wrote: should have known better when NOONE from the first r in the second

Dro B (br) wrote: Awesome action movie

Lynda M (us) wrote: Belita turned to the screen after her Olympic success as a skater / dancer who was a household name in the 40's and 50's. Sadly the films were poorly made and although she was quite famous at the time, her career dimmed and today she is now mostly forgotten.

Terminator 8 (kr) wrote: I laughed 3 times or 2 when I saw it!

Marko Z (de) wrote: A hyper-realistic thrill ride, a movie without anything to take me out of it, it is pure cinema.

Jayakrishnan R (fr) wrote: 73%Saw this on 6/7/16It uses its interesting premise to the maximum, but does not take anything much different than the cliche ridden path of the genre. The ending lacks strength despite having a lot of potential. The cast is good.

Justin B (mx) wrote: The action scenes are some of seagal's best and his martial arts are finally used to full effect by pairing them with kinetic camera work and slick stylization yet without the charming 80's/90's action feel its hard to forgive the inept storytelling.

Joseph B (ru) wrote: Great movie and as long as you don't measure it against formulaic comedy that is handed out hundreds of times each year, then you will enjoy it too.

Thea K (it) wrote: Pace is like water... sometimes as slow as a drip and then in a rush. It classically tragic but ulimately hopeful. According to the last shot in 2001 there were the same number of widows living in Insia nder similarly difficult circumstances as this film, as there are Canadians. It's overwhelming to think about. We take so much for granted in western cultures.

Antonius B (us) wrote: As Einstein said about Gandhi, a quote included at the end of this movie, "Generations to come will scarce believe that such a one as this ever, in flesh and blood, walked upon this earth." Critics of this film will say that's in part because of the mythologizing of Gandhi, which director Richard Attenborough contributes to by not showing us questionable aspects of Gandhi's personal life, or some of the opinions he held. Just one example of the latter was his very nave attitude towards Hitler, which I chalk up to the limits of his idealism more than anything else, not evil on his part - but that would have been 'fair ground' for a more accurate and balanced portrayal of the man. However, I have to say, those who focus on these omissions miss all that was absolutely accurate - and truly inspiring - in the film. This epic movie has beautiful shots of India and is beautiful in spirit. Who can possibly not be moved by this great man, whose simplicity and nonviolent approach to oppression and violence inspired Indians and the world? He endures beatings without raising a hand, and his moral rectitude and dignity never waver in dealing with the British, his countrymen, and his peers in the 'Home Rule' movement. He eschews pomp, embraces poverty, and demands authenticity. In testifying in his own defense while on trial, he says simply "Non-cooperation with evil is a duty, and that British rule of India is evil." In speaking with British officials, he says "In the end you will walk out, because 100,000 Englishmen simply cannot control 350 million Indians, if those Indians refuse to cooperate - and that's what we intend to achieve - peaceful, nonviolent, non-cooperation, until you yourselves see the wisdom of leaving." He tries desperately to hold Hindus and Muslims together in the aftermath, but is frail and then is of course assassinated.Perhaps the most difficult to watch or even fathom is the Jallianwala Bagh massacre in Amritsar, which Attenborough shows us right before the intermission. The brutality and cruelty of British Colonel Reginald Dyer is staggering, as was his callousness in the inquiries afterwards - and there is no exaggeration in the film. There are aspects that can be questioned about the film - why a white man was hired to play the part of Gandhi (even though Kingsley is fantastic), why Jinnah was portrayed in too negative a light (possibly due to the influence of the Indian government, who helped sponsor the film), and why Gandhi was overly idealized. It's not perfect, and neither was he. However, the truth is that the man was courageous, enlightened, and an awe-inspiring moral beacon to us all. His words were beautiful - and the film gets all of this right. For companion reading, try 'Mohandas Gandhi Essential Writings', which has a number of fantastic passages, and provides a more complete view of the man. In the meantime, I highly recommend this movie. Just one more quote, in his speech in front of a packed house, which threatens to become violent in the face of unfair new British Laws:"In this cause, I too am prepared to die; but my friends, there is no cause for which I am prepared to kill. Whatever they do to us, we will attack no one, kill no one, but we will not give our fingerprints, not one of us. They will imprison us, they will fine us, they will seize our possessions, but they cannot take away our self-respect if we will not give it to them. ... I am asking you to fight. To fight against their anger, not to provoke it. We will not strike a blow, but we will receive them, and through our pain, we will make them see their injustice, and it will hurt, as all fighting hurts. But we cannot lose. We cannot. They may torture my body, break my bones, even kill me - then, they will have my dead body - not my obedience."Hallelujah.

peter h (us) wrote: Mill Creek's 50 Movie Pack: Chilling Classics Reviews WILLARD HUYCK & GLORIA KATZ'S MESSIAH OF EVIL /THE SECOND COMING [1973]: Long before husband and wife Willard Huyck & Gloria Katz where behind script of George Lucas' AMERICAN GRAFFITI [1973] and the infamous HOWARD THE DUCK [1986] ; the pair behind these films had made a now cult classic horror film. Starting life in 1971 under the title THE SECOND COMING the investors who were involved with the project pulled out towards the end of the film's production. The film was then left unfinished until another investor brought the footage, had it edited together and realised the film 1973 under a new title, MESSIAH OF EVIL. Of course the film ended up in near obscurity not long after it's realise. Upon most likely a few TV screenings, Home media and the fact the films copyright has since lapsed making it a Public Domain Film under US law. MESSIAH OF EVIL has now since become a sleeper cult classic. While not a widely known Cult film, I like other people hold this film in high regard. Instead of going for all out graphic violence that other low budget contemporaries productions where making. This film relies mainly upon an atmospheric sense of dread, mood, hypnotic imagery, an ambiguous plot, and building of tension to make the viewer seem uneasy. THE PLOT: Sees a young woman in an asylum reflect upon how she got there. The flashback shows the young woman searching for her missing father in a small costal Californian town. The woman soon finds the town is bizarrely cold and hostile to her enquires. The woman soon meets with a posh paranormal investigator and his female entourage who are interviewing a wino (played by Elisha Cook Jr) about a local legend of the blood moon. The group join the woman at her abandon fathers house where the join in the search for him (and mooch of the offer of free accommodation). However when it becomes clear that the town's residents are becoming horrifying zombies; the group are placed in a dire situation. THOUGHTS: Despite a slow start, this film really becomes atmospheric with the help of a sense of mystery and the lack of an explanation of what is going on. With the use of vivid colours, creepy set designs including the realistic painting figures on the walls of the artist home, the deliberate slow building of tension and an artistic vibe really works in this films favour. For a low budget picture from a bygone era it really gets under your skin much like another forgotten cult horror films. My rating is a much deserved 80% for such a ghoulish gem.

EWC o (ru) wrote: Great atmosphere and bizarre, inexplicable scenes, but it dragged and I just didn't get a lot of its meaning.

gary t (de) wrote: WOW......WOW......WOW.....WOW.....STUNNING.....FANTASTIC.......GENIUS.....SUPERB.....WHAT A BRILLIANT CLASSICS MOVIE 2 WATCH, I AM A FAN OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK AS I THINK THAT HE IS A BRILLIANT MOVIE DIRECTOR.........its got a great cast of actors/actresses throughout this movie.....I think that jon finch (.R.I.P.), alec mccowen, barry foster (.R.I.P.), billie whitelaw (.R.I.P.), play good roles/parts throughout this movie......I think that the director of this drama/horror/romance/mystery/suspense/thriller movie had done such a fantastic job of directing this movie because you never know what 2 expect throughout this movie......the whole cast is:::Jon Finch as Richard Ian "Dick" BlaneyAlec McCowen as Chief Inspector OxfordBarry Foster as Robert "Bob" RuskBillie Whitelaw as Hetty PorterAnna Massey as Barbara Jane "Babs" MilliganBarbara Leigh-Hunt as Brenda Margaret BlaneyBernard Cribbins as Felix ForsytheVivien Merchant as Mrs. OxfordMichael Bates as Sergeant SpearmanJean Marsh as Monica Barling Clive Swift as Johnny PorterMadge Ryan as Mrs. DavisonElsie Randolph as GladysGerald Sim as Solicitor in pubNoel Johnson as Doctor in pubJohn Boxer as Sir GeorgeGeorge Tovey as Neville SaltJimmy Gardner as hotel porterRita Webb as Mrs. RuskMichael Sheard as Jim, Rusk's friend in pub Cast notesAlfred Hitchcock's cameo appearance can be seen (three minutes into the film) in the centre of a crowd scene, wearing a bowler hat. Teaser trailers show a Hitchcock-like dummy floating in the River Thames and Hitchcock introducing the audience to Covent Garden via the fourth wall.Michael Caine was Hitchcock's first choice for the role of Rusk, the main antagonist, but Caine thought the character was disgusting and said "I don't want to be associated with the part." Foster was cast after Hitchcock saw him in Twisted Nerve (which also featured Frenzy co-star Billie Whitelaw). Vanessa Redgrave reportedly turned down the role of Brenda, and Deep Red?'?s David Hemmings (who had co-starred with Redgrave in Blow-Up) was considered to play Blaney. Helen Mirren, who later in life played a film version of Hitchcock's wife Alma Reville in Hitchcock, met with the director and eventually turned down the role of Babs Milligan, and years later regretted it.I think that this is such a thrilling enjoyable Hitchcock movie 2 watch, I think that Alfred Hitchcock is such a brilliant director.........Frenzy ranked #33 on Variety's list of the 50 Top Grossing Films of 1972. The movie had total takings of $4,809,694 at the domestic box office (the United States and Canada), which is approximately $27,209,017 in today's funds.The film was the subject of the 2012 book Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece by Raymond FoeryAfter a pair of unsuccessful films depicting political intrigue and espionage, Hitchcock returned to the murder genre with this film. The narrative makes use of the familiar Hitchcock theme of an innocent man overwhelmed by circumstantial evidence and wrongly assumed to be guilty. Some critics consider Frenzy the last great Hitchcock film and a return to form after his two previous works, Topaz and Torn Curtain. 3 Henrietta Street in Covent Garden was the flat of the 'Necktie Strangler', Robert RuskHitchcock set and filmed Frenzy in London after many years making films in the United States. The film opens with a sweeping shot along the Thames to Tower Bridge, and while the interior scenes were filmed at Pinewood Studios, much of the location filming was done in and around Covent Garden and was an homage to the London of Hitchcock's childhood. The son of a Covent Garden merchant, Hitchcock filmed several key scenes showing the area as the working produce market that it was. Aware that the area's days as a market were numbered, Hitchcock wanted to record the area as he remembered it. According to the making-of feature on the DVD, an elderly man who remembered Hitchcock's father as a dealer in the vegetable market came to visit the set during the filming and was treated to lunch by the director.No. 31, Ennismore Gardens Mews, was used as the home of Brenda Margaret Blaney during the filming of Frenzy.During shooting for the film, Hitchcock's wife and longtime collaborator Alma had a stroke. As a result, some sequences were shot without Hitchcock on the set so he could attend to his wife.The film was the first Hitchcock film to have nudity (if you don't count Psycho, which featured out-of-focus breasts in one shot of the shower scene). There are a number of classic Hitchcock set pieces in the film, particularly the long tracking shot down the stairs when Babs is murdered. The camera moves down the stairs, out the doorway (with a rather clever edit just after the camera exits the door which marks where the scene moves from the studio to the location footage) and across the street where the usual activity in the market district goes on with patrons unaware that a murder is occurring in the building. A second sequence set in the back of a delivery truck full of potatoes increases the suspense as the murderer Rusk attempts to retrieve his tie pin from the corpse of Babs. Rusk struggles with the hand and has to break the fingers of the corpse in order to retrieve his tie pin and try to escape unseen from the truck.The part of London shown in the film still exists more or less intact, but the fruit and vegetable market no longer operates from that site, having relocated in 1974. The buildings seen in the film are now occupied by banks and legal offices, restaurants and nightclubs, such as Henrietta Street, where Rusk lived (and Babs met her untimely demise). Oxford Street, which had the back alley (Dryden Chambers, now demolished) leading to Brenda Blaney's matrimonial agency, is the busiest shopping area in Britain. Nell of Old Drury, which is the public house where the doctor and solicitor had their frank, plot-assisting discussion on sex killers, is still a thriving bar. The lanes where merchants and workers once carried their produce, as seen in the film, are now occupied by tourists and street performers.Novelist La Bern later expressed his dissatisfaction with Shaffer's adaptation of his book.SoundtrackHenry Mancini was originally hired as the film's composer. His opening theme was written in Bachian organ andante, opening in D minor, for organ and an orchestra of strings and brass, and was intended to express the formality of the grey London landmarks, but Hitchcock thought it sounded too much like Bernard Herrmann's scores. According to Mancini, "Hitchcock came to the recording session, listened awhile and said 'Look, if I want Herrmann, I'd ask for Herrmann.'" After an enigmatic, behind-the-scenes melodrama, the composer was fired. He never understood the experience, insisting that his score sounded nothing like Herrmann. In those days, Mancini had full music measurements sheet and he had to pay all transportation and accommodations himself. In his autobiography, Mancini reports that the discussions between himself and Hitchcock seemed clear, he thought he understood what was wanted, but he was replaced and flew back home to Hollywood. The irony was that Mancini was now being second-guessed for being too dark and symphonic after having been criticized for being too light before. Mancini's experience with Frenzy was a painful topic for the composer for years to come.Hitchcock then hired composer Ron Goodwin to write the score after being impressed with some of his earlier work. Goodwin's music had a lighter tone in the opening scenes, and scenes featuring London scenery, while there were darker undertones in certain other scenes.The second to last feature film of his extensive career, it is often considered by critics and scholars to be his last great film before his death. The screenplay by Anthony Shaffer was based on the novel Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Bern.The film stars Jon Finch, Alec McCowen, and Barry Foster and features Billie Whitelaw, Anna Massey, Barbara Leigh-Hunt, Bernard Cribbins and Vivien Merchant. The original music score was composed by Ron Goodwin.The film was screened at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival, but was not entered into the main competition.The plot centres on a serial killer in contemporary London. In a very early scene there is dialogue that mentions two actual London serial murder cases: the Christie murders in the early 1950s, and the Jack the Ripper murders in 1888.Frenzy was the third film Hitchcock made in Britain after he moved to Hollywood in 1939. The other two were Under Capricorn in 1949 and Stage Fright in 1950 (although there were some interior and exterior scenes filmed in London for the 1956 remake of The Man Who Knew Too Much). The last film he made in Britain before his move to America was Jamaica Inn (1939).I think that this is such a fantastic British thriller-psychological horror film, to watch as the director keeps you on the edges of your seats throughout this movie.....it is such a gripping movie 2 watch it is such a thrilling movie 2 watch with a brilliant cast throughout this movie.......

Noname (jp) wrote: I saw Invicible last week and now this one and both are true story movies about football. The Rock fits quite great as the coach in this drama/sport movie with a bit of gangsta style. Nice film !

Brandon P (ru) wrote: Loved Russell Crowe as Sid 6.7 this is one of the few movies that I was rooting for the bad guy....

Walter V (br) wrote: Well made but WTF are they talking about!

Bill R (kr) wrote: the movies animation was done well, but that was probably the only really good thing about this. the r rated comedy falls short on adult humor and sticks to a late teens mind and doesn't take it further. the story was decent and the voice acting, at times, felt like they were just reading through to get done. not one to go out of your way to watch but decent if you're bored with nothing else on.