7 minut

7 minut

N/A

Seven minutes - sweet moment that can change lives forever. History of several autumn, although extremely hot days in the life of Piotr Winkler (Przemyslaw Sadowski), who in an unexpected way loses control over his stable and secure life. 37-year-old designer, happy husband of Marta (Agnieszka Warchulska) and Agnieszka's father, goes to conference as a substitute for a colleague. There he meets an attractive brunette (Anna Prus), which will soon topple the peaceful, happy world upside down. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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7 minut torrent reviews

Kristen P (ru) wrote: A fantastic French comedy.

Rohit A (au) wrote: Finally, something decent emerges from the Bollywood stable this year. As always, Actor/Director Rajat Kapoor brings audiences a challenging film that tears through conventional Bollywood filmmaking norm, and once again comes out a triumph. After the impressive two-punch of Mixed Doubles and Raghu Romeo, Rajat tries his hand at a gangster film with Mithya. Publicized as a comedy to lure audiences in, for the most part the film is actually a drama with elements of dark comedy. Without giving it away, let me just say that Mithya's story is akeen to taking Shahrukh Khan??s Om Prakash Makhija character and dumping him into the world of another Shahrukh starrer, Don, without the masala. Moreover, Mithya is a much better product than the former films, sorry Shahrukh Khan. With that being said, the film is a clever mix of dark comedy and traditional drama, with some brilliant performances complimenting a wonderful 'different' script. Ranvir Shorey is excellent as a man striving to figure out who he is, and where he belongs. He effectively portrays the range of emotions needed for his character. The rest of the cast support Shorey effectively. This is a movie that will make you laugh, cry, and think. See It!

Ethan P (kr) wrote: Hall Pass has a funny idea and the right actors to make it something special, but this film's ends up being bland, uneventful and unfunny. Instead of going all out and ridiculous, they play it safe and lame.

Tommy D (kr) wrote: A really engaging feel-good comedy about the on-the-road adventures (and misadventures) of the Hoover Family.The cast don't deliver amazing performances as in this movie is the fast and twisty screenplay that does most part of the job. And it's more than enough.

Timothy R (mx) wrote: sublime wander narrative as in, let's wander about not because we're rich students on holiday backpacking through europe. no. wander 'cause we're fucking poor, hungry, displaced somewhere in france trying to survive, find work, believe, hope, live, smoke, move to the next squat-site desperate with no pride left nor hope maybe but one of us will dream big and the other will too but differently with grim results. great script, story and acting by both women.

Jeffrey G (us) wrote: I really enjoyed this movie from start to finish. It was a bit long but otherwise great!

Deborah L (kr) wrote: Excellent. Can't go wrong with Alan Rickman and Madeleine Stowe. Tense, interesting, intriguing, thrilling.

Matt C (ag) wrote: alot nice titty, but suckass moive

G S (ag) wrote: Very stylish film with a very intriguing premise. Watching this film reminded me of the feeling I had when I watched Godard's Breathless. The cool protagonist and a seductive blonde as his partner, accompanied by a classy score, this is a film that epitomizes the French noir films of it's time. The one problem I had was when Louis cannot steal the German's Mercedes because the German hid something the first gear of the gearbox. After Louis kills him, he manages to drive away in the Mercedes without adjusting any gearbox or anything; it wasn't a huge deal but it was confusing. Although there is quite a break from convention, the ending does not manage to tie up all the loose ends in a completely logical and realistic manner. Malle does cover his tracks and there is not any inconsistency in the ending, however, it seemed a bit out of place with the rest of the film.

Davey M (fr) wrote: "Bigger Than Life" works simultaneously as a parallel to a specific social issue (the film, as we learn in the opening credits, was based on a newspaper article about addiction to cortisone) and as a striking parable about the more prevalent dangers eating away at the American family beneath the sunny Cleaver family exterior. On the one hand, a cigar is just a cigar and the cortisone really is cortisone--"Bigger Than Life" brought to light the perils of mental illness and drug abuse, and that concern is clearly front and center, as the film unmasks a reality we'd still frequently just rather not talk about nearly sixty years later. But the film works just as well with the cortisone functioning (at least in part) as a metaphor for the patriarch's addiction to capitalism, consumerism, and taskmaster-ism--the same work-yourself-to-the-grave American dream mentality Tati pokes fun at in "Jour de Fete" is ruthlessly laid bare in Ray's film. While Ed Avery's drug addiction is front and center, it is his dissatisfaction with his dull suburban life and job that comes first--he can't even stand to be in the same room with their friends, and the cortisone merely enhances tendencies that are already all too evident. Mason's performance as the Avery patriarch is astonishing, towering, obliterating stuff. His English accent and oozing urbanity set him apart as something of an outsider from the beginning--the smoothly parted hair, handsome face, and aristocratic voice feel utterly out of place in the classroom, and it's Mason's sophistication that sells his character's shame at taking a second job as a cab driver, and, later, creates such a startling effect when Avery starts to come utterly unhinged, turning from an ordinary man into a monster as he pushes his son and himself to be bigger than life--smarter, stronger, faster, the perfect student and the perfect athlete. As Avery transforms from schoolteacher into brutal disciplinarian (contrast his first scene with a student to his later scenes with his son), "Bigger Than Life" turns from domestic melodrama into domestic horror, with the mother and son prisoners in their own house (both literally kept behind locked doors at different times in the film) and the father's shadow weighing down on them oppressively, trapping them in the frame. It's self-improvement taken to a self-destructive extreme--not just self-improvement, but eternal progression, with Ed Avery's desire to keep up with (and surpass) the Joneses eventually taking on blasphemously biblical proportions. Avery's American dream followed to its logical conclusion is absolute power--the attainment of godhood and the perversion of godhood, with Avery's unforgiving perfection resulting in condemnation without exception (including himself, including God Himself: no one is beneath Avery's judgment). Perhaps the most shocking aspect of Avery's decision to kill his son, his wife, and himself is not how illogical it seems, but the cold, prevalent logic underpinning it. The cortisone enhances them, but these are symptoms we already know.

Eleanor R (gb) wrote: ok i only watched 45 minutes of this movie... it was interesting and dull all at the same time.. or maybe i am just too tired to watch this kind of movie... who knows?!

Jeff B (ag) wrote: The greatest automaton achievement of the film was making Melanie Griffith look young again. Only 58 but looks 80, except here. As far as the story is concerned, nothing new for the dystopia crowd. Same ol' same ol'. Just the same ol' depressing, nothingness of the post-apocalypse world. Do we learn anything with the typical interaction between man and automaton? No. I started watching this one night and forgot I had been watching it until a few days later when I sat down to watch a movie remembering I hadn't finished this one. By tomorrow I'll have forgotten it again, no doubt.