Acacia

Acacia

A Korean horror film about an adopted young boy with a strange link to an old, dead acacia tree. As the boy settles in to his new home, the tree comes to life. When the family who adopted him becomes pregnant, he is to go back to the orphanage, and horror ensues.

After unsuccessfully trying to have a baby of their own, Dr. Kim Do-il and his father convince his wife Choi Mi-sook to adopt a child in an orphanage. Mi-sook is connected to arts and ... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Acacia torrent reviews

Alex L (au) wrote: Incredible, moving film with an exciting insight into the restaurant world and cross cultural cuisine.

Raunak C (it) wrote: Vincent Vega, Colin Coutinho, Toby Follet & Michael Barbossa

Alonso A (mx) wrote: This second installment in the Three Colors trilogy takes a different approach in the way to deliver its message. Instead of all the psychological angst of Blue, we get a quirky dark comedy about revenge and justice, without losing any of the masterful aspects of Kieslowski's directing (again the cinematography and the music are outstanding) and complemented with solid actings from Zamachowski and beautiful Julie Delpy. It sure is more accesible, and even inferior to its predecessor, but White stands on its own, and is another great entry into the Polish master's catalogue.

Frank P (fr) wrote: Prostitution...S&M...hot skinny women...mistresses...Say no more!

Clarke D (ca) wrote: Band of the Hand is a truly terrible film. Horrible acting and plot. Avoid at all costs!

ABBIE B (es) wrote: TOP RATE ACTORS GREAT MOVIE

Emily A (it) wrote: The unfortunate start of the quirky girl genre, but I guess it isn't Allen's fault that this push resulted in Zooey Deschanel. Very clever, definitely succeeds at being the cynical romantic comedy it's trying to be by showing how people can have functional, overly intellectual (rather than emotional), empty relationships. Kind of disturbing in that way. Was that the point though, or is Woody Allen's philosophy on relationships just revealing its shittiness while trying to show substance? I don't know. They have no chemistry whatsoever, but if the point was to show the emptiness then kudos I guess.

Jeremy N (gb) wrote: Sequel to They Call Me Trinity and very much in the same vein combining western action and humour.

Eric R (us) wrote: Written by Tennessee Williams and directed by Elia Kazan, Baby Doll was an a controversial film at the time for it's 'indecency". The story revolves around Archie Lee Meighan (Karl Malden), a load-mouthed, alcoholic deep south cotton gin owner. He is married to "Baby Doll" a young teenager who refuses to sleep with her husband until her 20th birthday. Their relationship is tumultuous as Archie Lee's sexual frustration is at an all time high. Enter Silva Vaccaro, a cotton gin competitor who is out to seek his "own brand of justice" after he realizes that Archie Lee is responsible for setting a fire to his own business operation. He sets his sights on "Baby Doll" as a way to get his revenge, and her affection. Carroll Baker as "Baby Doll' is painted in an extremely sexy, luscious light in the way she acts and is photographed. The way she talks and acts is very shy and timid, and quite frankly sexy, in the way that men typically have an attraction too. It's the type of character who has no idea she is tempting these men, but almost everyone she talks too is in a flirtatious, baby doll sorta sexuality. Honestly, I don't think I can think of a female character from the time period that was this sexy, particularly in this naive type of way. I really like Karl Malden but I can't decide if his performance was strong or if he was overracting. He is an oafish character for sure, but the whole movie he is just yelling at everyone. That being said, the final confrontation scene is great and I really did feel for Archie Lee's character, even if his approach wasn't particularly. Kazan's focus is on an old fashioned story of justice and revenge really focuses on this strained martial relationship. I can't say it it was intentional but he seems to somewhat comment on how "Baby Doll" is really far too young to be involved in a commitment like marriage. How 'Baby Doll' talks, plays hide and seek, and even sucks on her thumb, we are shown how she is just a child and really has no chance against older men with stronger, more deceitful minds.

Nick F (de) wrote: Comical and colorful describes this pirate movie where a sizable amount of the action and dialogue centers around kissing!? Flynn wisely plays it with a wink and a nod to the audience with his trademark charm. Maureen O'Hara is a knockout dressed in her pirate gear (check out those boots!); indeed all of the pirates look splendidly eye-catching. The costume design goes a long way in this movie and serves as its highlight. Other aspects of the production however prove to be less then inspiring. When one compares to a movie like The Sea hawk, the pirate ship sets and the miniatures don't hold up well. The Technicolor brilliance that highlights the costumes so well end up sinking Fx for this movie. Likewise the script, even as its obviously played for lighthearted fun ends up being very juvenile (especially all the talk of kissing). Not one of Flynn's best, but mildly diverting for some performances and the costumes.

Paul M (ca) wrote: A gritty interpretation of Romeo & Juliet as only Abel can do. The problem now is that it really is a film of its time and comes across really dated.

Matthew D (mx) wrote: One of Burton's best, one that succeeds in rounded portrayals and engaging performances. It tones down the Burton aspects to make the comedy funny and the drama real. Ed Wood captures the earnestness of the titular subject perfectly.

Faley A (gb) wrote: Only 'Howard Shore's music was excellent..all others were below average..poor movie.

Melanie M (ag) wrote: Sally Field is so adorable in this film. Some parts undeniably, were a bit awkward and uncomfortable (hence my 3 star rating). Overall, had funny parts and a strong message about friendship.