Barbie in 'A Christmas Carol'

Barbie in 'A Christmas Carol'

On Christmas Eve, Kelly is reluctant to go to a Christmas Eve ball, so Barbie tells her the story of Eden Starling, a glamourous singing diva in the Victorian England and the owner of a theatre house. However, Eden is self-centred and loves only herself. She is frequently accompanied by her snooty cat, Chuzzlewit. She does not believe in Christmas and orders all her employees to work on Christmas.

Barbie stars in her first holiday movie in this heart-warming adaptation of the classic Dickens story filled with cherished Christmas carols, fabulous fashions and lots of laughs! . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Barbie in 'A Christmas Carol' torrent reviews

Mike B (it) wrote: I think the only reason this is playing on cable is that Jennifer Lawrence is briefly in it.

AJ T (de) wrote: I'm ashamed not to have seen this by now.

bill s (mx) wrote: The original is a classic but this is just a cheap knockoff.

Toms S (es) wrote: I would love to give them 10 stars ... Watch it and ya will know y

Matt T (nl) wrote: Racism and religion; an eternal bond.

Kevin N (es) wrote: A film most notable for its mood swings- incredible shifts in tone which cause the film to alternate between genres. It's funny and dramatic, spooky and beautiful. The film is anchored by Walter Huston's addicting and amusing performance as the devil himself, Mr. Scratch. His wicked sense of humor and haunting whispers earned him an Academy Award nomination, and the performance is still as effective today. However, he isn't the only one working hard; Edward Arnold is richly heroic as the film's other title character, and James Craig is absolutely wonderful as the very human Jabez Stone, a man torn between success and devotion, both in the name of his beloved wife, Mary (Anne Shirley). But a good film is made out of the sum of its small parts, and two of this one's strongest are its devilish musical score (an early one by the great Bernard Hermann) and its crisp and expressionistic cinematography, gorgeous black and white imagery by cinematographer Joseph August.