Bill Bailey: Dandelion Mind

Bill Bailey: Dandelion Mind

Featuring Bill’s trademark musical interludes, observations and stories of the road, Dandelion Mind will be based loosely on the theme of doubt (or will it?), as we follow Bill from his real-life saga of being trapped by the ash cloud, to his barely contained rants about celebrity, TV, creationism and Michael Winner. He demonstrates new instruments, both ancient and modern, he sings an internet love song, a lament about punk heroes, Iranian hip-hop, and plays a mean folk-bouzouki. Thomas the Doubter gets a new look, and Darwin’s curious obsessions and the myth of intelligent design are all worked over in Bailey’s own surreal style. He revisits the music of his youth, with a brand-new French Disco re-working of Gary Numan’s hit, Cars, played in his own inimitable way, and maybe some Wurzels-based remixes of classic German techno. Just your normal Bill Bailey gig, then. Filmed at The O2 in Dublin in October 2010

Featuring Bill’s trademark musical interludes, observations and stories of the road, Dandelion Mind will be based loosely on the theme of doubt (or will it?), as we follow Bill from his real-life saga of being trapped by the ash cloud, to his barely contained rants about celebrity, TV, creationism and Michael Winner. He demonstrates new instruments, both ancient and modern, he sings an internet love song, a lament about punk heroes, Iranian hip-hop, and plays a mean folk-bouzouki. Thomas the Doubter gets a new look, and Darwin’s curious obsessions and the myth of intelligent design are all worked over in Bailey’s own surreal style. He revisits the music of his youth, with a brand-new French Disco re-working of Gary Numan’s hit, Cars, played in his own inimitable way, and maybe some Wurzels-based remixes of classic German techno. Just your normal Bill Bailey gig, then. Filmed at The O2 in Dublin in October 2010 . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Bill Bailey: Dandelion Mind torrent reviews

Bearded M (es) wrote: DC does it again. Crisis on two earths is a great story with a good amount of action, humor and pretty much everything you could want in a Justice League movie. My only real complaint is not having Kevin Conroy voice Batman, William Baldwin was not bad, but he just did not have the power and emotion that Conroy brings to the role. Having James Woods as Owl Man was a stroke of genius, and it was cool though having Mark "Leroy Jethro Gibbs" Harmon playing Superman, no head smacking though, although I guess I can understand why they didn't have Superman slapping people in the back of the head all the time, cause they wouldn't have a head left and all. Anyway, great movie, tons of fun and again, DC owns Marvel in the animated universe.4 Beards Out Of 5

Hamka S (nl) wrote: xpenah plak aku tgok crite nie...,besh ker?

Kevin Q (de) wrote: It had a great twist and actually kept me interested throughout the film. Good actors, however it felt like it lacked something. Not sure if it'll be liked bby others, it is worth a watching.

Mac A (us) wrote: A movie with a great potential slightly stunted by its low budget, The Puffy Chair nevertheless has some really great moments. With a convincing script and some great, genuine acting, this realistic love story is one well worth seeing.

Melody C (it) wrote: keeps you guessing til the end. ;)

Phillie E (fr) wrote: I'm a dude, he's a dude, she's a dude, they're all duds.

Johnathan M (br) wrote: Must see. Wild, psychedelic, grotesque, surreal, and hilarious.

Alyan H (us) wrote: A laugh a minute riot. Classic 90's comedy with an all-star cast.

Joshua N (ru) wrote: Not nearly as good as the first one.

Yoav S (mx) wrote: Half-baked theories about love, fidelity and attraction... hilarious at the beginning, but tedious after 20 minutes.

Gianluca P (mx) wrote: Maybe a little bit slow, but a surely well shot movie, supporting a sick and tough story. Particularly good the actress acting as Solange.

Blake P (br) wrote: To have a good time with "Bananas," you must accept it for what it is, which is a series of sketches piled together to assemble a vaguely conceived plot. I suppose it has a story, but its scenes are dotty and scattered, sequences never quite wanting to come together in solidarity. It feels like a congregation of tossed about comedic ideas from its director/writer/star, Woody Allen. But though it takes more than a few minutes for us to accept its crackpot dizziness, we eventually come to like it for the way its satirical jabs jab hard, and for the way Allen validates himself as just as good of a performer as he is a filmmaker. It's not his best, but maybe that's because "Bananas" was released relatively early in his career and sees him at a time when he wasn't quite ready to be, pardon the term, an artiste. But we can't watch the film attempting to draw comparisons to his overall career - it's not "Hannah and Her Sisters" or "Everyone Says I Love You," nor is it trying to be. Coming at the "early, funny" part of his filmography, it is better contrasted with "Sleeper" and "What's New, Pussycat?," when he was still working out his kinks but nevertheless the maker behind several ingeniously funny comedies. "Bananas" finds him slightly scattered but still nifty, it containing a sizable amount of capably performed physical comedy routines and enough one-liners to kill a man. In it, he plays Fielding Marsh, an indelibly nervous blue collar worker who inadvertently lands himself in the position of a revolutionary after trying to win the heart of Nancy (Louise Lasser), a social activist. A product tester very much in the midst of mundane routine, he's not the type to get so involved - but, wanting to show his potential lady love that he's a man of strength, he heads over to San Marcos, where civil unrest is brewing. Almost offed by the region's government, he is saved by revolutionaries, and is, in return, trained to work alongside them with offhanded bravery. He gets in over his head, however, when he is persuaded to pose as the face of the revolution, which throws him into deep trouble after the U.S. catches a whiff of his escapades. In terms of summary, "Bananas" sounds like a cohesive, if totally bizarre, comedy, but it is not so much a conclusive work as it is a marathon of cutting, brief satires, taking aim at everything from the media's ravenous thirst to make a story out of anything to the clichs that befall the romantic comedy genre. It's perhaps even reminiscent of "Airplane!," just without such an overwhelming abundance of visual gags. But because of its flip-flop nature, "Bananas" never really has a specific tone, as it sometimes feels like a screwball comedy homage and sometimes feels like a rom-com spoof. When the film fails to put two and two together, though, Allen's comedy remains buoyant and pointy, laughs moving everything along more than a plot ever could. And this subversion somehow remains adequate - Allen has the pen to back up his cuckoo, and he and his performers (especially the exquisitely droll Lasser) are proficient in selling the nonsensicalities. "Bananas" isn't one of Allen's finest, but subpar Allen is still pretty darn good.

Edith N (br) wrote: More a Cynic Than a Bohemian This seems to be a continuation of the theme of "some people just need their lives managed for them." Oh, no one here will self-destruct in quite the spectacular fashion of Bing Crosby in [i]The Country Girl[/i], but at least one character in this movie leaves me wondering how he survived before he ended up in another character's orbit and what he'll do if he's ever out of it. He's just going to be lost. The world is not kind to some people, and this guy simply doesn't have the gumption needed to live in the real world. He still doesn't, at the end of the story, have anything like the coping skills he's going to need, especially if the planned trip to Hollywood is made. Still, he's probably not going to hurt himself or anyone else. I also rather suspect that the character he's running off to Hollywood with will blossom out there in ways the other characters wouldn't expect. William Powell and Myrna Loy are together again as Charles Lodge and Margit Agnew. She is probably upper middle class, a businesswoman with her own clothes shop and a radio show about fashion. And a younger sister, Irene (Florence Rice). Irene is engaged to Waldo Beaver (John Beal), because their mother picked him out for Irene. Margit has decided that the time has come for them to get married; they've been engaged for four years. Irene, on the other hand, wants to run off to Hollywood and become an actress. She's encouraged in this by Charlie, an artistic sort himself who lives out of a trailer because it's more interesting than a house. Margit distrusts him as soon as she finds out he exists, and she goes to tell him to leave her sister alone. Especially because Irene decides she's not going to marry Waldo, because she's in love with Charlie. Only Charlie knows she isn't, and he knows he's in love with Margit. He is not the only person who knows this, but he is the only person who both knows it and is in a position to do anything about it. This being a William Powell and Myrna Loy movie, there's no suspense about whether they'll get together or not. There is merely the anticipation of how it's going to happen. There are various stumbling-blocks over the course of the movie, but even if the poster didn't show them together, they're William Powell and Myrna Loy. It's always kind of odd to me when they're in movies wherein they're romantically involved with other people. I mean, I know they weren't ever remotely romantically involved in real life, but they just fit so well onscreen. It's kind of helped here by the fact that I don't think either character is really taking life seriously. He's got his plan for how to sort the sisters out, which is the sort of thing which belongs on a wacky '70s sitcom, but it doesn't really matter. It's just a cheap way to find a path through the subplots to the resolution. I'm not even sure there's a plot. Just two characters on their way to the end. I will say, though, that Charlie doesn't feel bohemian, and that's because he's played by William Powell. It isn't that he was well over forty at the time. It's possible to be older and bohemian at the same time. It's also true that the moustache could be seen as the kind of thing you got at the time. It isn't even that he's pretty clean, even when he claims he's dirty. It's that he doesn't seem to be actually interested in the lifestyle he talks up. It's hard to believe he left his first wife, Claire (Katharine Alexander), out of any kind of desire to live a life on the road instead of one of comfort. On the other hand, it's also hard to believe that she ever slept under the stars in Burma. So. Still, he supposedly wrote a screenplay which might just launch Irene to stardom, assuming her costar is someone less wooden than Waldo. He's also supposedly painting a portrait of Margit which will be his masterpiece. And he's able to make a decent living selling paintings. And I don't buy it. Still, there are moments where it doesn't matter that Charlie seems as much an itinerant artist as Godfrey did a Forgotten Man in [i]My Man Godfrey[/i]. He knows that Irene and Waldo may have gotten together because her family decided it was right for both of them, but they're still better off with each other than either would be with anyone else. He knows what it will take to make everyone concerned happy, though I do find myself wondering exactly how happy he and Margit are going to be after their honeymoon is over. Really, what's happened here is that we've hit a stopping place in the story, not an ending. Waldo is still going to have his inherent doormat nature once he sobers up. Margit is not going to be much inclined toward roaming the country in a tiny, battered trailer, but Charlie isn't going to want to move in with Margit and her servants. We're never going to see how they learn to compromise, and we just take it for granted that they will. But Charlie already left one wife.

GM W (kr) wrote: For David Cronenberg's son, you can tell the resemblance. Good creepy thriller

Raymond E (de) wrote: This movie is a SNOOZE fest. The ONLY thing worse is Start Trek V. I grew up with the Star Trek TV show. When I watched this pile of GARBAGE in the cinema, I really did NOT understand what had happened. But whenever I have trouble sleeping... I just start this movie and drift off into 2 hours of uninterrupted REM sleep.