Cats & Dogs

Cats & Dogs

When a professor develops a vaccine that eliminates human allergies to dogs, he unwittingly upsets the fragile balance of power between cats and dogs and touches off an epic battle for pet supremacy. The fur flies as the feline faction, led by Mr. Tinkles, squares off against wide-eyed puppy Lou and his canine cohorts.

  • Rating:
    4.00 out of 5
  • Length:87 minutes
  • Release:2001
  • Language:English
  • Reference:Imdb
  • Keywords:spy,   mouse,   spoof,  

A look at the top-secret, high-tech espionage war going on between cats and dogs, which their human owners are blissfully unaware of. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Cats & Dogs torrent reviews

Carlos G (es) wrote: I'm usually all about documentaries, and especially musical artist. This was long and dragged out. Lots of great interviews but yes boring.

(es) wrote: Cast: Max Minghella, Sophia Myles, Matt Keeslar, John Malkovich, Jim Broadbent, Anjelica Huston, Joel David Moore, Scoot McNairy, Ethan Suplee, Nick Swardson, Adam Scott, Jack Ong, Jeremy Guskin, Monika Ramnath, Isaac Laskin Director: Terry ZwigoffSummary: When his pure genius goes ignored and a brainless jock tempts his dream girl (Sophia Myles), ambitious art school student Jerome Platz (Max Minghella) sets in motion a brazen plan to become an art world hero and win his beloved's heart. John Malkovich, Jim Broadbent, Matt Keeslar, Anjelica Huston and Ethan Suplee co-star in Terry Zwigoff's dark comedy about an overachiever who goes to extremes to get the girl.My Thoughts: "I saw the trailer and was fooled into thinking this was going to be a quirky film with dark humor. Unfortunately all the humor is shown in the trailer and still there isn't nearly enough. I soon became bored with the film and I thought the main character Jerome was annoying and not likable. I love John Malkovich, Steve Buscemi, and I also enjoy Jim Broadbent, but their parts are small and not used nearly enough. The big twist is seen a mile ahead and the ending is how you expect it to end. Definitely something I wouldn't watch again."

Augustine H (es) wrote: The sadistic plot reveals the ugly one's worse self. The peculiar atmosphere is haunting.

Edgar C (kr) wrote: Cocteau uses his "astonishing" cinematic abilities to merge magical elements and catchy technical camera tricks to confirm himself as a poet, constructing an extraordinary contribution to fantasy in cinema and one of the rarest tragedies ever shown on the big screen. The core of Cocteau's poetry is love and its overwhelming power, even capable of destructing the borders of Death. Just beautiful... 99/100

Wayne K (it) wrote: A film which this year celebrates it's 90th birthday has been frequently cited among the greatest of all time, and has occasionally occupied the top slot on such lists. As a propaganda film it shamelessly depicts its antagonists as cruel snobs who care nothing for those below themselves, and gives them no redeeming features whatsoever. Most of them don't even have names. Without paying even close attention, many of the technical cracks are plain to see. It's integration of stock footage and even cutaway shots to what looks like a toy ship floating in a tub of water against a grey backdrop seem especially silly by today's standards, but what still holds up are its themes and morals. Much like The Bicycle Thief, another masterpiece, simple human desires, in this case the craving for liberation and fair treatment, appear small at first, but the film cleverly amplifies them to the point where you can feel them in every moment. The Odessa Step sequence, a scene that bears the drool marks of film historians and directors the world over, still holds up very well, existing as a hallmark of directing, camera-work, editing and stark, often brutal imagery. It's not the kind of film you would watch on a regular basis, especially if entertainment is all you seek, but with ever-relevant themes, a stirring musical score and surprising tension and emotional heft, Battleship Potemkin is rightly regarded as a piece of seminal cinema.