Crutch

Crutch

An autobiographical film taken from the experiences of writer-director Rob Moretti, CRUTCH is a coming-of-age tale about a young man's struggle with family problems and substance abuse. Behind a facade of suburban middle class perfection, David's home life is falling apart. As he tries to cope with the impossible situation, the troubled and impressionable teenager falls under the spell of Kenny, a georgous, thirty-something, has-been actor turned theatre coach. When Kenny's "support" escalates into seduction, David slowly decends into an abyss of drinking and drug addition from which he must escape if he is to survive. CRUTCH is a dramatic tale of the confusion of youth and the difficulties in finding oneself.

An autobiographical film taken from the experiences of writer-director Rob Moretti, CRUTCH is a coming-of-age tale about a young man's struggle with family problems and substance abuse. ... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Crutch torrent reviews

Jorge G (mx) wrote: Esperaba un poco ms, pero no me desagrad,es la segunda que veo de Bruce la Bruce, y creo que es un director medio exc (C)ntrico y no del gusto de muchos, pero con cosillas interesantes.

Maranda F (it) wrote: This was an AWESOME vampire movie. I loved it.

Takako T (it) wrote: such a heartwarming movie.

Charles P (de) wrote: This overproduced bore is all promise and no payoff, all concept and no content, all toys and no play.

Luke B (us) wrote: Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice starts with an excellent shot. Riding in the back of a car are two women, one is dressed in modern westernised clothes, while the other is dressed in a kimono. Such a shot perfectly captures many of Ozu's themes. Ozu then strengthens his topics with a simple conversation where Setsuko discusses seeing a French movie. Taeko is a bored housewife that insults her husband on a country getaway with her friends and niece. This really offends her niece Setsuko, and when it comes time for a wedding interview Setsuko is terrified that she will end up like her cruel aunt. Taeko's husband Mokichi is a very simple man with great patience. He tries to go along with his wife, but eventually it all becomes toomuch. She doesn't like the way he eats, the way he travels, or the cigarette brand he smokes. If I have one problem with this movie it's that Taeko is the most unlikable of Ozu's characters I have seen. She is simply cruel to an extent that it goes beyond culture/generational differences. Luckily it all adds together for an incredible ending. In true Ozu style, the married couple struggling to make something as simple as rice ignites their love and they decide to really make a go of things. It's really comforting to see a film that avoids all melodrama and rushes to the airports. It proves that subtlety can be a powerful thing.

Will C (ag) wrote: I wish they'd show this instead of Bicycle Thieves all the time, because it's a beautiful film and will make you cry.

Niccol N (de) wrote: One of Hitchcock's finest films, and one of my personal favourites. What did they really think was with it at the time ? It's very psychological (well, Hitchcock after Psycho), and reminescent of Vertigo. 64-year-old still manages to keep the tension high when it's needed, and proves he becomes better the older he gets. Bernard Herrmann's last great score for Hitch (unless, of course, the unused one for the following "Torn Curtain")