Dick Tracy vs. Cueball

Dick Tracy vs. Cueball

Expensive diamonds are stolen but before the thief can fence them he is strangled by ex-con Cueball, who then takes the gems and continues murdering people he believes are trying to swindle... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Dick Tracy vs. Cueball torrent reviews

Mark C (mx) wrote: Who would have figured sh*t got so gangsta up in Van Buren, Maine.

WS W (br) wrote: It looks like < American Pie > kinda absurd, dirty sex-joking movies for high school kids. Not really. On a contrary, it is indeed quite decent & bittersweet all the way, although not that original.

Asa B (es) wrote: I was never really sure where the film was supposed to be heading or for which of the characters we were supposed to be rooting. Bette Midler shone in every scene in which she appeared, but otherwise this was just 'meh'.

John B (br) wrote: The profile of Ian Curtis of Joy Division is gripping. You will recall that I'm not a huge fan of rock biopics but Anton Corbijn does an excellent job of profiling the genius and madness of Curtis.

Devan Y (ru) wrote: i loved this.. it was "diffrent" .. but cute love story.

m f (au) wrote: good documentary about music

Rajni G (gb) wrote: I love dis movie so much... i don't rememebr even hw many times i watched this movie & still ready to watch it any time....simply love this movie........

Danielle C (es) wrote: An old classic, cudnt stop my feet from moving!!

Joseph S (nl) wrote: Hans Richter and some of his friends in the old time surreal avant garde gang; Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, John Cage, Max Ernst, decide to get together and direct a suprisingly acessible (for these guys this is Oceans 11), film about a man who sets up a buisness selling dreams to people, who cant' have any of there own. After all, as our narrator Joe, informs us, "If you can look inside yourself, other people shoudnt be any problem". Assorted "characters" come into the Dream shop, a gangster, a repressed banker, an overzealous pamphletere, a blind man, a bored housewife, etc, and all are given dreams, each one directed by a different surrealist; Ernst, Duchamp, Ray, etc. Which alternately, delight, offend, distrub, and annoy there patrons. In that respect it's a little like an anthology film, with each dream, a story in the story, the best of which is a satire of conventional(1940's) relationships, staring two mannequins who fall in love and get married. It's a suprsingly charming and funny little feminist music video (I want the soundtrack, just for this sequence). Though the rest of the music is handled by experimental composer John Cage, who gives the film both a traditional comedic tone and one of ambigious drones and general avant-gardishness. The narravtive of the framing tale, that is the story of Joe, owner and dream weaver of the buisness, is also distinct in that, none of the characters mouths move, and when dialogue does take place on screen it comes as voice over, usually with one characters monologues followed by the others...most of which is spoken in a kind of Beat style rhyming (this is also a decade before any of the big Beat writers Keroac, Ginsberg, etc, start publishing.). That though a bit silly at first, actually enriches the story, really quite beyond, any individual dream sequence. If you like early avant gard films or the artists involved, this is an absoulte must see, but if your also just interested in early comic fantasy, stories about dreams, poetry, or just watching something visually different, that doesn't just dismiss narrative as a nuisance, it's worth the price of admission. Few films see the relationship of dream, cinema, and audience this clearly or disticntly. It's the feel good avant garde comedy of the 40s! If only it would get released on dvd already...

Steph W (br) wrote: I've wanted to see this forever, just never got around to it :X

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