Ed Byrne: Crowd Pleaser

Ed Byrne: Crowd Pleaser

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Ed Byrne: Crowd Pleaser torrent reviews

Anna C (de) wrote: Remake of an old John Wayne movie, it's a western without shame nor glory. The one thing to talk about is the participation of Donald Sutherland: he's on scene just for few minutes, but he strikes, as always!

Lasse C (us) wrote: Half-way decent premise is ruined by bad acting and a director who is so involved with ADHD style that he forgets to tell a story.

Ashley (us) wrote: it is the best movie and its sad

Anna C (gb) wrote: Nice movie, nothing more.

Weisi L (it) wrote: great ensemble acting.

Orlok W (kr) wrote: Magical movie, wonderful music--A Swedish classic!!

Brennen T (au) wrote: Best 45 minute film yet!

Aj V (nl) wrote: A fantastic crime/prison movie, the story is really incredible, and the actors are great. The only problem is that it's a little too long. Other than that I loved it.

Matthew B (ca) wrote: What the hell did I just watch?.

Jose Diego D (de) wrote: Another failed attempt to remake a masterpiece.

Luke H (fr) wrote: A mistaken sewage worker gets called in as a local sheriff in order to put a stop to local bad guy 'The Rumpo Kid'

Al M (au) wrote: I was sorely diappointed in Die, Monster Die!, particularly after watching The Dunwich Horror, which was another Daniel Haller directed/Samuel Z. Arkoff production of a Lovecraft story that was also featured as a part of the same Midnight Double Feature DVD. Die Monster Die! is almost completely unrelated to Lovecraft's stellar story "The Colour out of Space" on which it is supposedly based. Die Monster Die has a few decent moments and does feature Boris Karloff, but ultimately I found it rather boring--the parts between the bizarre action were too lengthy to sustain interest in the film. Perhaps enjoyable on a b-movie comedy level but not much good otherwise.

Anne F (gb) wrote: John Wayne, who was rather good in his role as a tough Marine Sergeant, whose men come to respect the way he treats them and his approach to the war.