El furgón

El furgón

Three second-rate delinquints - a retired, crippled pickpocket, a man born and raised in a prision who's never seen a day of freedom...

Three second-rate delinquints - a retired, crippled pickpocket, a man born and raised in a prision who's never seen a day of freedom... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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El furgón torrent reviews

Angel D (nl) wrote: the gangsta life is wild, they all nuts..

Neil P (br) wrote: Dragged on a bit but was well worth watching in the end partly as its a true story. Good acting and production.

Nathaniel B (jp) wrote: Not quite as good as "The Dark Knight", but good nonetheless.

Patrick P (de) wrote: Perhaps the greatest documentary I've ever had the privilege of watching.

Curtis I (fr) wrote: This is an unbelievable documentry that aired on PBS and it is told by the indivudals of a radical time in America history the 1970s I totally agree with Robert Denerstien, Robert Denerstein, Denver Rocky Mountain News If names such as Bernadine Dohrn, Bill Ayers, Mark Rudd, Naomi Jaffe and Brian Flanagan mean nothing to you, you'll definitely want to see the thought-provoking documentary, The Weather Underground.I bought this movie and one other movie on Amazon and you can watch them instanly.If you want to see it send me a private message and I will share with you my amazon account information where you can also watch "My real fathers dream"

Aki K (kr) wrote: "Earth just got its last warning", laughing out loud ridiculous marketing for a cheap Encounter variant. The movie does not even have any "alien hunting"!

Sarah F (es) wrote: Yeah, i'd like to see this, i think!

Benjamin K (ru) wrote: A genius and poignant movie that changed everything I knew and made the world a brighter place to live in, for all of us, even if we weren't aware of it.

Grayson D (br) wrote: One of the worst of this series in what is amongst the worst comedy series ever.

Stephen E (de) wrote: Visually, "Quest for Fire" is an ugly film, and that's not just because all that it captures are filthy Neanderthals. The cinematography is drab and muddled and the idea of shot composition seems to have been ignored almost entirely. Whether this technique is intentional or not is beside the point; it makes the movie hard to watch. It's cool that there's an actual movie about cavemen and their discovery of fire, but it's hard to make unintelligent characters like these interesting or even close to likable. The locations are beautiful and the makeup is amazing, but I personally don't find much of interest in "Quest of Fire." It's a respectable work that I imagine some will grow to love; I'm just not one of those people.

Carlos M (jp) wrote: A gripping political epic of ambitious discussions (and with a splendid production design) about an idealistic journalist/activist who became an ardent revolutionary to fight for what he believed in, and it is very well edited and well paced for a film that runs for over three hours.

Colonel K (mx) wrote: Apocalypse Now is not just a war film its "The" war film. I don't think there will ever be another war film like it. everything is great in this movie the acting,visuals,sound, and even the chilling soundtrack.

Brian S (kr) wrote: I think this is one of Robert Mitchum's best performances, and I love the interaction with Debra Kerr.

Krishna C (mx) wrote: Slow paced thoughtful and stark space drama but didn't feel much connection with the characters. Better than Interstellar though!

David C (ag) wrote: "War Games" is so much more fun than it has a right to be. Being a 1983 movie that trades heavily in technical jargon and low-res computer readouts, it should feel hopelessly dated; it doesn't. As a movie that makes plucky teens its heroes, it should feel juvenile and frivolous; it doesn't. Since its plot is an explicit reaction to Cold War tensions, it should come across as heavy-handed and moralizing; it doesn't. Good acting, writing, and directing-the basics of movie-making-conspire to avoid these pitfalls, seemingly almost in spite of themselves.Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy were two of the most successful teen stars of the 80s for a reason. They look and talk like the kids next door. In this movie, both of their characters would be artificially, almost eerily normal, the Hollywood version of "average" kids, except that they're both just a little bit "off" in ways that aren't necessarily intended but are nevertheless endearing and refreshing. Broderick, probably by nature rather than decision, underplays everything even in the face of nuclear Armageddon, and this works because it keeps the tone light. Another way to balance the apocalyptic plot that places tens of millions of lives on the line would have been to make the acting comically over-the-top, but this would not have been as relatable and would quickly have become tiresome. As for Sheedy's character, she could easily have been just another movie girlfriend relegated to the sidelines, but the script adds idiosyncrasies and Sheedy brings a playfulness that keeps her sharing the spotlight for most of the film. She rides a motorcycle on which Broderick's character rides behind her, a fact that goes rightly unremarked in the movie but which I think deserves approbation from commenters, and she has a charismatic way of sauntering freely into places she isn't expected.The set design has the visual appeal of a Bond movie, with a huge, flashy command center, an underground bunker, and an antagonist's plush island retreat. The camera has lots of room to play among these sets, but the scenes in Broderick's prosaic classroom, closet-sized school office, and cluttered bedroom look small and cramped. His escape from them into the wider, more dangerous world of high-stakes espionage therefore feels like breaking free, and it is a journey we want to go on instead of nitpicking the nonsense of it all. The script gets away with a lot of loose logic because it moves so fast and keeps introducing new twists. Instead of just explaining himself to the authorities (who are doubly stupid here: they have the stupidity of military brass in an anti-war movie and the stupidity of adults in a teen movie), Broderick goes it alone. When the military is told they're playing a game, they persist in thinking it's real, and when Broderick is told early on that his "game" is "definitely military" software, he promptly "plays" it anyway. But the movie knows what it's doing, even if the characters don't, and makes a point of the lack of distinction between games and reality for the computers that we program to manage both. It sounds like a sci-fi premise, but in a rarity for sci-fi and "hacker" movies, the script gets a lot of the technical language right. Like, for example, the concept of "computer learning," which in the movie and often in real life is explored through games of tic-tac-toe.Though in many ways a relic of the '80s, "War Games"'s smart decisions keep it entertaining for more than just the nostalgic.