El ratón Pérez

El ratón Pérez

Lucia loses a tooth, her dad tells the story of the Hairy Tooth Fairy, a mouse named Perez who collects kids' teeth & polishes them into pearls. Perez is kidnapped by bandits. Lucía & cousin Ramiro rescue PÃrez unleashing a fascinat

Lucía, an active little girl, looses a tooth. Santiago, her father, is an out-of-work boss, and her mother... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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El ratón Pérez torrent reviews

Sparsh D (ru) wrote: Entertaining. Very good chemistry between Akshay Kumar and Asin. Poor acting by Himesh Reshammiya. Funny but has a lot of random nonsense in it.

Logan M (ru) wrote: Lowbrow, but entertaining nonetheless.

Chris T (it) wrote: An awesome film that no-ones ever heard of!

Ilona W (au) wrote: Amazing cast! Awesome performances! Beautiful story! Love the soundtrack!

The Critic (us) wrote: Notable for the more steady alliance between black and white characters than others in the genre, 'Blacula' is one of the more known and discussed entries from the blaxploitation era. Overall, the film is a bit of a mixed bag. There's lots of fun to be had here, especially in way of horror and action sequences (the pyrotechnics are excellent), but the story doesn't always maintain momentum. William Marshall is strong in the titular role, though Vonetta McGee is less competent as the object of his desire; the pair also lack chemistry to give their blossoming romance bite, so to speak. The production is redeemed by an excellent title sequence and stunning soundtrack. It was the first picture to receive the Best Horror Film nod at the Saturn Awards and was followed by 'Scream Blacula Scream' in 1973.

Justin M (gb) wrote: John Wayne; Guns; Horse chases, and a young girl in need of redemption; Henry Hathaway's "True Grit" does just that, and brings life down to the gritty realities we all face, which is that the decisions we make, and the people who we involve ourselves with, shape what we ourselves feel and call living. The action and clearly blatant figure of John Wayne drive the movie to the audience of young and older men, living vicariously to be what they feel is one of the crowning faces of masculinity, but being a particularly well rounded movie, the duo of Wayne and his co-stars appeal to not only a specific audience, but to a general audience as well. Alongside John Wayne who plays the part of Marshal Rueben J. Cogbu rn, stars Kim Darby as well as Glen Campbell as respectively Mattie Ross and a French-Texan Ranger named La Boeuf. The movie follows the story of Mattie, a wealthy young girl who after her father leaves for a trip with an old time friend named Cheney that he has taken in, is brutally shot and murdered by that same friend, portrayed very well by Jeff Corey. Mattie catches wind of the incident, and now is fueled by her rage and will stop at nothing to catch the elusive Cheney who disappears after the incident. One of the moves Mattie makes is enlisting the help of the very unorthodox and drunken Marshall Cogburn, and allows La Boeuf the Texan Ranger to tag along as well, he running into her while being on search of his own for a comrade of Cheney's. Though the story is very much Mattie's and her movement towards as mentioned earlier, getting redemption for her father's death, undeniably the draw for the film is John Wayne; who happened to win an Oscar for his performance in the movie. He draws you in with his logic and the way he seems to handle the issues in complete contrast to Mattie and her eccentric ways, and La Boeuf who just seems like he's trying to keep up. The initial draw for the movie as such would be to feel manly, and as the title suggests, know the meaning of "True Grit". What is surprising, is that throughout the entire length of the film you begin to notice a type of chemistry between the three travelers that makes you sincerely feel for them when trouble, or travail befalls them, and as the movies draws to interesting climaxes, you find yourself thoroughly invested in each of the Characters growth and development. In that aspect, it has the added and needed drama aspect that you would need, without throwing it in your face, or throwing you off with off color or unnecessary "sappy" moments. Though John Wayne did ultimately steal the show, my hat goes off to Kim Darby in this film for her portrayal of a young girl who brings a type of reality and true emotional stability to the picture, a "real drama" as I'd like to call it. From the first five minutes of the movie, you're forced into Mattie's world, who with her Tom-Boyish attitude and round about sense of humility, really appeals to the young generation and otherwise wouldn't. You find yourself cheering her on as she gets closer to her goal, which she is completely passionate about, in scenes where she expresses herself to the trumping of even Marshal Cogburn as well as La Boeuf on their adventure. For me personally, this was the highlight of the show, watching how this young girl brought a drunkard and ranger into her world, and not only through mutual interest, but pure, persistent passion. Passion that brings out kindness out of the Ranger, passion that brought heart to a Marshal. True Grit is a great time, and it does well with show the sides of drama as well as "grit" that is needed is this type of film, the appeal is feels real, and the lessons very timely.

Daniel P (ag) wrote: So-so historical fiction of the founding of Chicago, as told through the O'Leary family (whose cow, according to rumor, started the Great Chicago Fire of 1871). Dion O'Leary (Tyrone Power) seems to be based on Dion O'Banion, leader of the Irish North Side Chicago mob who was killed by the Italian South Side mob led by Johnny Torrio, and later Al Capone. I hate, hate, hate when movies portray sexual assault evolving into romance, even when the assaulter is Tyrone Power.

Thomas B (fr) wrote: ****Although the movie suffers with some pacing issues, and an over-performance by Sean Penn at times, 'Mystic River' is a really good entry from Clint Eastwood, thanks to an excellent script by Brian Helgeland, and a great performance by Tim Robbins.