Female on the Beach

Female on the Beach

Lynn Markham moves into her late husband's beach house...the morning after former tenant Eloise Crandall fell (or was pushed) from the cliff. To her annoyance, Lynn finds both her real estate agent and Drummond Hall, her muscular beachcomber neighbor, making themselves quite at home. Lynn soon has no doubts of what her scheming neighbors are up to, but she finds Drummond's physical charms hard to resist. And she still doesn't know what really happened to Eloise.

Moving into a beach house involves Lynn Markham in mystery, danger, and romance with a beach boy of dubious motives. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Female on the Beach torrent reviews

Phil N (jp) wrote: Holly is a seasoned pro, taking one last job before escaping to Paris. Shay is a young runaway, just arrived in Sydney and new to the business. Their paths collide as Holly needs a partner for her latest client, and the pair witness a murder which sets in motion a frantic chase through the streets of Kings Cross. Directed by Jon Hewitt who made the underrated Acolytes, this is a pacy thriller full of kinetic camera work. With copious nudity and violence, it's certainly seedy, but the characters don't engage as much as you'd like and there's a sense we've seen this type of escorts-in-peril tale played out too many times before.

Jessica T (de) wrote: I love this movie!It has really good music!

Allan C (kr) wrote: This film plays like an SNL a parody of a bad Nicolas Cage, except that it really is a horribly bad Nicolas Cage film. Looking a the credits you'd think there's a possibility for some quality, based on a Philip K. Dick story, directed by Lee Tamahori, music by Mark Isham, and a supporting cast that includes Peter Faulk, Julianne Moore and Jessica Biel. However, the film is from a script from the people behind "Navy Seals," "The Saint" and "Halloweentown" part 1, 2 and 3 and therein lies the problem. The story involved Cage as a Vegas performer can see two minutes into the future, who the government wants to recruit for their own purposes. Cage doesn't like that and doe son the run, using his powers to elude the authorities and to woo love interest Biel. Cage get's to make lots of hilarious goo goo eyes at Biel (along with his magician flowy hair) are quite hilarious, but the tedium of the rest of the film vastly outweighs the entertainment value of Cage's unintentionally funny moments. I suppose a a few well constructed chase scene avoid this film getting zero stars.

Stephanie R (es) wrote: Very interesting take on International adoption. I am not sure I get what Sayles was trying to get at, but I do wish that there were more movies about this subject. Good movie, worth suggesting and possibly watching again.

Maria C (ru) wrote: Beautifully photographed, nice, easy athmosphere, exagerated dramma. A movie of several contrast and suspended issues which remain un-resolved by the end of the movie. Erotically beautifully painted, blue as a theme - Ilona's outfits are simply beautiful. but... even if majority of characters have good motivations, the story is loose.

Julie K (br) wrote: filme pra ingls ver. pssimo.

Igor A (kr) wrote: osven sto moze da se vidi prvata voopsto uloga na Leonardo DiCaprio, drugo ama bas nisto nema vredno tuka za gledanje...sepak poveke gi sakam Gremlinite

Paul Z (nl) wrote: John Schlesinger's Sunday Bloody Sunday is social realism, as seemingly unusual as its scenario is and however much poetic license the script and direction take. Yes, it defies all perceived social convention. We follow a triangular sexual relationship comprised of a man and a woman, both middle-aged, and another man, much much younger. There is a scene where young children innocently smoke a joint after breakfast, because they know where their out-of-town parents keep it. But the lack of permanence implicitly shown in mercilessly intimate scenes of parties, workplace conflicts, doctors' appointments, bar mitzvahs, et al, are concerned with the politics of the personal rather than the traditional. It's an exploration of characters at crossroads in their lives, those roads intertwined. The screenplay by Penelope Gilliatt takes us through eight or nine days, while a young man, played very becomingly by British singer Murray Head, plans to leave for New York. Both of his lovers will miss him, and I guess he will miss them, in his own way, yet he has chosen to go, and between them, they don't entice him enough to make him want to stay. So the two love affairs begin their dissolution, while the lovers go about a moody everyday life in a London mostly comprised of frigid twilights. An aria from Mozart's comic opera Cosi fan Tutte is played on the soundtrack with ironic detachment. And then there is Mendelssohn's utterly romantic On Wings of Song, its minor key tonality embraced. Both the doctor and the woman are concerned with helping people, he by an altruistic and astute way with his patients, she through working in an employment agency. The boy however gives the impression of being solely absorbed in the marketing possibilities in America for his ultra-modern sculpture. He isn't even worried whether his stuff is any good, but whether it will sell to Americans. Indeed, he doesn't appear to feel very intensely about anything. He is nice enough and open enough, but there is no range to him, as there is to his lovers. Played with perfect pitch in deservedly Oscar-nominated performances by both the great Peter Finch and Glenda Jackson, it is with these two older characters that we get to the nerve center of the story. They survive in a lose-lose world by adjusting themselves to life as it must be lived, such as how Finch, the doctor, not at all internally bothered by his homosexuality, doesn't disclose it to his opaque Jewish family. Continuing fraternization as usual with them is another way for him to survive. Jackson says late in the film, "Some people believe something is better than nothing, but I'm beginning to believe that nothing can be better than something." Well, possibly so, but we get to know her well enough to reckon that she will shake on something, not nothing, once more the next time. That they're inclined to share him is maybe a tell: They share him not because they're inclined to accept half, but because they're apprehensive about going for all. The three-sided understanding is somewhat an assurance that no one will get in so far that being refined won't be barrier enough against heartbreak. It's the ultimate moral dichotomy in liberalized society: The philosophy of whatever works, but that can hurt people. Yet don't people suffer when bound by convention too? We are free to do what we want, but then people still choose to do what they don't want to do at all. Look at the scene where the young man and his female lover, who is watching her friends' children, and they have a fun time in a park by a church, which unexpectedly and senselessly leads to a tragic accident involving their dog: The kids are all having happy reckless fun, but there are casualties. The little girl disobeys, but she's a little girl in the throes of fun. Her dog's accident is nevertheless her fault. With pleasure, blameless or not, there is always pain, intended or not.

Benjamin W (ru) wrote: An interesting mix of film noir and science fiction, Godard pulls out all the stops in this visual piece of art. Having honestly not seen anything like this before, there are elements of it that have been imitated since (like in "Brazil" (1985) and "Birdman" (2014)) that just shows how groundbreaking this film was for its time.

Christopher S (ca) wrote: Only marginally compelling Neo-Realist character drama from writer-director Pier Paolo Pasolini. Anna Magnani is loud and annoying as the title character (she has this obnoxious, wide-mouthed laugh that is particularly grating), but fortunately most of the film focuses on her son played by Ettore Garofolo, who puts in a fine performance. The meandering story does have its moments, but overall it's pretty forgettable.

Eric R (it) wrote: While in his office, the new chairman of a large cemetery (Richard Boone) works on a large map which represents the occupied plots. Black pins represent occupied plots and white piins representing empty lots that have been purchased but not yet filled. After a mix up with the pins, several people start dying which inevitable leads this man to believe that he may be god. Is it just a coincidence, or does he really have power to dictate life and death? Bury the Living is a pretty cool premise that feels a lot like a slightly longer episode of the Twilight Zone episode. This man is not evil; Most of the film is spent as he struggles to deal with what is going on and how no one believes this ability of his to be true. Richard Boone really does a good job as this conflicted man who begins to essentially lose his mind because of this. I Bury The Living has some inventive cinematography and sound design, particularly for the time, but I never felt like the film made it to the level of being considered a great film.

Anthony I (br) wrote: Such a sweet movie. Watching these old-musicals for me is like eating candy. It's too much, but you can't help yourself. Funny Face is fun to watch. Ok, the songs are forgettable. But what a pairing! Audrey and Fred are a match made in heaven. Boy, could they dance. Audrey's beatnik dance is easily the most memorable scene. Everything here is so vibrant and alive, in glorious Technicolor.

Private U (jp) wrote: Demi Moore as a rich girl cum detective ... Kevn Costner as a serial killer ..... slips from B, to C, to D grade as time goes on .... slabs of ridiculous dialogue and crazy side stories ruin what may have been interesting. Frank banned from choosing movies from now on!

Jose Luis M (br) wrote: Film noir por excelencia, personajes oscuros llenos de culpa y una Jane Greer como prototipo de femme fatale. Magnfica direccin de Jacques Tourneur.

Steve A (br) wrote: I've seen this a couple of times now, and the first time through I wasn't all that impressed. But a repeat viewing had me laughing regularly, so that's something. Still, not for everyone though.