From the Journals of Jean Seberg

From the Journals of Jean Seberg

Mark Rappaport's creative bio-pic about actress Jean Seberg is presented in a first-person, autobiographical format (with Seberg played by Mary Beth Hurt). He seamlessly interweaves cinema,...

Mark Rappaport's creative bio-pic about actress Jean Seberg is presented in a first-person, autobiographical format (with Seberg played by Mary Beth Hurt). He seamlessly interweaves cinema,... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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From the Journals of Jean Seberg torrent reviews

Sean D (jp) wrote: I'm gonna say this once and then never again. SyFy original films are usually original, for the most part. The problem is that they just flat out suck. The plot is original, the deaths are original, but the movies are just bull or stupid killed off by cheesy and terrible plots and bad actors, that's the issue with this one like most of the others.

Corbin R (ag) wrote: Only made to steal your money and make you stupid.

David R (jp) wrote: The least boring film of the year - a lovely meditation on the floodtides of change sweeping China, viewed through the eyes of real and fictional characters affected by the closure of a military hardware factory. Gorgeous imagery, and a lively interplay between reality, myth, history and fiction. If you're looking for something smart and quiet to counterbalance the louder movies of summer, this is it.

Rocky G (gb) wrote: I liked that I could relate to the religious struggle that the movie portrayed...

Peter W (ag) wrote: Only if you've read the book.

Steve M (kr) wrote: Very low budget horror from the UK. But enough interesting character play and good tension building to make you keep watching. The pay off/twist of the story may be a bit weak but over all worth a watch if you are into this kind of thing.

Jessica O (mx) wrote: is that her boob on the cover???

Matthew L (mx) wrote: Classic gangster flick. Cagney at his best!

Mark N (au) wrote: Very good quality New Zealand film.Methodical and heavy on the heart.

Carole S (it) wrote: Okay...I'll be honest....the main reason why I wanted to watch this was because of James Purefoy and Paul Giamatti. Love them! Besides for the actors and the awesome fight scenes this...well...disappointed me. It was extremely historically inaccurate and there was a huge lack of dialogue and depth. Pretty much the actors are the only ones who saved the film. Especially James Purefoy who played the Knight Templar, Thomas Marshal. Thomas Marshal is made up (I looked) and was based off of the famous William Marshal. Poor Thomas. He lost everything in one day thanks to good ol' King John. He snapped and decided enough was enough, so he teamed up with Baron d'Aubigny. They take over a different Baron's castle and hold up against King John and his Danish army until the French arrive. Throughout all this there is blood and love. Yes....there is a love story between Thomas and Lady Isabel (the castle's baron's wife. Tsk). It was forced and just didn't make sense. o.o She pretty much raped him, because he refused and said he was a man of God and had given up normal life to fight for God. She was like, "NO WAY JOSE! THE ORDER IS DONE, SO LET'S GET IT ON!" And he responded, "NO, NOOOOOOOOOOOO!.......OKAY. Just this once though!" Tsk, tsk. I feel like they forced this romance to add more depth to the story, but it failed. Plus it didn't help that they made her look slutty.Is there and HEA? That I can not tell you....but the ending will make you shake your head. I loved the last fight between the head of the Danish army and Thomas. Awesome and had me worried for Thomas. There were lots of sad heroics, but then...something happened and it made me mad. I can not say, but alas, that's not how it should have ended.There's not much else to say. This was okay and I enjoyed it well enough. It was an interesting take on a historical event that happened during the time of King John and the magna carta. The amazing fight scenes and actors are the only reason to watch this film. If it wasn't for them...this would have been crap. I wish that they would have cut out the romance between Lady Isabel and Thomas (because it would never had happened). Also, the ending made me shake my head. I loved the last epic fight scene and the heroics...but the last 5 minutes was not okay. I would recommend this to those that like James Purefoy and for those that love a good war movie. Out of five stars I will grant this...ummmmm.... 2 stars. Favorite Character(s): Thomas, King John (just because of the actor and how will he played him), Daniel Marks (hahaha), and the SquireNot-so Favorite Character(s): Lady Isabel

Arslan K (nl) wrote: Wow I thought this was great! I loved it! Guy Ritchie shows his awesome skills in this. I loved this kind of British gangster film (mostly all guy films) I wasn't liking this in the beginning but loved it as it went on.

Emily A (fr) wrote: Most likely an accurate portrayal of hating your family if you are selfish and generally suck as a person. Well-done. Well acted, especially by michael Shannon (what else is new). It delves deeper into despair than most "suburbia-is-hell" films. Recommend, but I wish the characters were a bit more complex so that their struggle seemed more worth exploring.

Jean C (it) wrote: Awesome movie! Our God is so real! Thanks for a great movie!!!!?

Logan B (au) wrote: Do not watch this movie. It is terrible. The second is much better (5 stars). If you have work to do and you watch this movie, you'll be wasting time. As I said, do not watch this movie.

Heather M (de) wrote: The beginning of this movie is silly fun and the ending is sappy and sweet - just skip the hour in the middle that everyone spends running around the very tiny island and you will find this to be very entertaining.

Phillip D (gb) wrote: Frankly, The Bronze was probably poorly marketed. The movie is, at best, in comedic terms, an extremely dark and dry comedy that really never strives for the obvious laughs that were available to it. However, I realized going in that this was a Duplass Brothers film. As film critics with more than a casual interest might have noticed (but clearly didn't), the Duplass Brothers aren't really into traditional comedies thus far, especially not the stereotypical Rogen-esque raunch-fest The Bronze could have been. Everything they have produced, comedies included, has always had deep undertones, often dark in nature. Don't get me wrong, The Bronze is fully justified in its R rating but unlike The Hangover or Ted, the offensive aspects of the movie aren't display bait, they are simply the pained lashing out of the main character. And that seems to be what The Bronze is really about. Probably suppressed (and likely never to be admitted to) because this sort of critical analysis isn't popular, The Bronze isn't a comedy about a washed up gymnast coming back through a new protege. The Bronze, first and foremost, is about how the Olympic process chews up and spits out young, impressionable athletes, particularly female gymnasts, who, even in 2016 (see Gabby Douglas or the Shawn Johnson story), face unbelievable and un-achievable expectations and standards, even as they are objectified and forced into real life character arcs, often before full adult maturity. The Bronze is a savage, mostly completed (there are some positives to the ending) critique of this nigh untouchable aspect of American culture and heroic idolatry. Frankly, there are a few laughs to be had, some moments of genuine levity and comedy but more than anything, The Bronze is dark and sad. It's a side of our flag waving, freedom delusional culture we hate to face. What makes an Olympic athlete what they are? What do they have to give up to get there? What normal human experiences to they miss in those moments? And, most importantly, what do they do when their short window goes away? As a society, we are more comfortable not asking these questions. The Bronze, for the most part, takes them on directly. We watch the twin developments of our main character and her younger counterpart, noting the lack of social skills, minimal life direction in a post-gymnastics world, the desperate race to slap logos on humans, the loss of moments of pure childhood joy and the all encompassing specter of competition, which casts a shadow over every character in The Bronze. It's painful at times, uncomfortable at others. There are moments of joy, moments of "American spirit" certainly, but these moments are tempered by the knowledge of how quickly they end. I suspect that for the majority of small minded critics, their review began and ended with a movie they expected to make them laugh making them uncomfortable instead. I can't spite them for that but The Bronze has something more complex going on and especially for progressive minded critics, it's something they should have picked up on. It's an advanced social critique that is coming on the horizon. The 2016 games in Rio have already begun to poke more holes in the rapidly deflating Olympic balloon. These games are hurtful, to the countries, to the city, to the people and to the athletes. Is there a way to change that? Sure but first we have to become comfortable deconstructing the nature of our sports idols, particularly the flag draped symbols of "freedom and the American dream" we like to parade about. The Bronze is on the right side of history and early in that regard. It won't get any love now but mark my words, The Bronze is one of the most prescient films of the last decade or so. That doesn't make it the best and that certainly doesn't make it a movie you'd like to sit through (see Blue Valentine) but it's certainly enough to make this movie fresh, worth watching and worthy of consideration in the coming years.

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