Hanezu

Hanezu

Based on a Japanese novel written by Masako Bando, the story revolves around Kayoko who lives with one man (Tetsuya) but is in love with another (Takumi).

  • Rating:
    4.00 out of 5
  • Length:91 minutes
  • Release:2011
  • Language:Japanese
  • Reference:Imdb
  • Keywords:fire,   mountain,   bicycle,  

Based on a Japanese novel written by Masako Bando, the story revolves around Kayoko who lives with one man (Tetsuya) but is in love with another (Takumi). . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

LinksNameQualitySeedersLeechers

Hanezu torrent reviews

Deven T (br) wrote: An exciting, brave, adventurous superhero film. Zokkomon is innovative, powerfully moving, tense, taut and energetic and heroic. Darsheel truly shines as Zokkomon. It certainly shows a true story of friendship, betrayal, finding family and finding your inner hero. The music also sounds super heroic.

Bridget P (fr) wrote: interesting documentary about the craziness of Manhattan's private preschools

Mr G (fr) wrote: I think the movie was 9 out of 10 however music 11 out 10 brilliant. The movie can be watched by all of the family and yet every1 will love every clip of the movie. However it is slow to get into the movie

Poo B (es) wrote: Seen it like 5 times but its still action everytime

Ethan B (es) wrote: While this is a film that feels very dated, it doesn't lack quality. Other than a setup that drags on forever, there isn't too much wrong with this film. With that said, there also isn't anything that makes it stand out from the pack either. Although it's technically sound, it doesn't have many traits that prevent it from being forgettable. The story may have been somewhat unique for the time period, but it's not told in the grandiose fashion that we have become accustomed to in this era of film.Henry Winkler and Shelley Long hold their ground pretty well here, but the highlight of the film is Michael Keaton who really keeps the film moving. You can't take your eyes off of him, whether you like his character or not.This is a great effort by Ron Howard and not a film that most people will hate, as it also gives us solid character development--especially with Winkler's character. The script is acceptable and the music is a great mark of the times. While the characters in this film are very often stressed out and distraught, Night Shift brings you back to a much simpler decade.Twizard Rating: 81

Nick F (br) wrote: Netflix is now streaming a version of this 1960 Roger Vadim vampire film. Unfortunately, it's a full screen version that's slightly faded. Pan and scan prints are usually forbidden on my TV screen, but BLOOD AND ROSES has a legendary reputation, and I have wanted to see it for decades. Based on a much drawn from novel by Sheridan Le Fanu, the story of a vampire possessing the body of Carmilla Karnstein to seek revenge on the Karnstein family this time takes place in the modern world; Vadim's Karnsteins are now the kind of wealthy, privileged jet setting Europeans that populate Fellini's LA DOLCE VITA. The film takes place in a country villa surrounded by vineyards, with an old, ruined church (symbolizing decadence) where the vampire spirit waits in its crypt for the opportune moment to inhabit Camilla, played by Annette Vadim, the scorned lover of elegant, sophisticated Count Karnstein. Mel Ferrer wanders through the film as Karnstein like a character from a Noel Coward play. Though it's not exactly clear why Camilla lives with him in the villa, especially since the Count has just announced his engagement to Elsa Martinelli, you accept it, as indeed one accepts all sorts of absurdities here. The marriage announcement is what gets the vampire spirit worked up, for she, too, had been spurred by a Karnstein centuries before. Needless to say, these relationships exist in a dramatic vacuum and are dramatized just enough to accommodate the film's gothic obsessions. It's the ghostly subtext, and not the story, that keeps us occupied, and that is often splendidly drawn in scenes that suggest a dark and forbidding sexuality - Roger Vadim's cinematic trademark. The version prepared for the United States (streaming on Netflix) is ten or so minutes shorter than the one shown in other countries, and comes with an infuriating narration by the vampire spirit incessantly explaining things that, I'm sure, the distributors considered over the heads of an American audiences. Even with this and numerous other blunders, the film glides weightlessly though its narrative, achieving moments of surprising lyrical beauty. Photographed by Claude Renoir, who's classically composed frames, expressive use of color (particularly the way he uses red), and captivating traveling shots, recalls the impressionistic paintings of his Grandfather. Vadim was never a good director, but he could occasionally be graceful. This is one of those times. With the TWILIGHT series prominently marketed these days, this fifty year old gothic confection is well worth the effort.

Connor G (gb) wrote: For a gangster movie from the 40s, it has a very modern feel to it with the treatment of Pinkie. He has a smoothness that the American gangster movies in the 30s lacked, but still didn't have quite the punch that they did.

Bheema D (us) wrote: If this was a movie just about spoiled white Cambridge kids who won a race, it would be a C movie at best, most probably shit. But this is a movie about religion, nationalism, and what it means to value where you come from. Problematic in multiple areas, but still very good. One thumb up, so to speak.

Fahad A (kr) wrote: good movie...great drama...excellent peace of work...