In the Garden of Sounds

In the Garden of Sounds

From the time he was a child Wolfgang Fasser knew he'd be blind in his twenties. But as darkness descended, a whole new world began to open up to him: the world of sound. He marveled at its...

From the time he was a child Wolfgang Fasser knew he'd be blind in his twenties. But as darkness descended, a whole new world began to open up to him: the world of sound. He marveled at its... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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In the Garden of Sounds torrent reviews

Nikola M (us) wrote: As it borrows the best elements from the beloved comics this movie makes for a fun and cartoonish film but doesn't make it memorable.

Carlos D (us) wrote: this movie is not,by any means,the greatest movie you'll ever see,but it is very clever,emotional and personal that it will keep you entertained from beginning to end

Private U (us) wrote: my favori love movie very good also soundtrack very slow

Carlos I (ru) wrote: Very slow moving, but interesting true crime story, aided largely by the incredibly sleazy portrayal by Richard Attenborough. This sneaky little bugger will have you shaking your fist at the screen with what he's getting away with.

David L (kr) wrote: Wonderfully acted by both Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger, finely scripted, masterfully edited and emotionally rich, In the Heat of the Night may have a simple plot, but this particular story is an entirely engaging one that is conveyed with evident warmth, terrific character development, strong acting, realistic depiction of racism at the time, great score and one of the most satisfying ending scenes ever. It is, in a year of very strong contenders, an entirely deserving Best Picture winner.

aaron s (au) wrote: I'm wondering why they made a movie in this character, the plot made no sense, and the casting was garbage. the only good thing was the effects.

Liam C (kr) wrote: For a film that managed to win Best Picture over 'Apocalypse Now', it's great to see how excellent this film truly is, and I'm pretty sure Hoffman's outstanding speech will quell any anger by a choice The Academy makes. 'Kramer vs. Kramer' is an excellently crafted drama with excellent performances across the board. I love how this film was made, it screams classic filmmaking, we know the entire setup for the plot in the first five minutes and it already has us hooked. Dustin Hoffman steals the show as the struggling father just trying to make everything work and I'm glad we see how he deals with everything, as this film tackles themes and stereotypes that still haven't been broken, even till this day. His look reminds me of Al Pacino from 'Dog Day Afternoon' here and it makes sense because they were both considered for that role because of how much they looked alike and looked like the real person. Meryl Streep was odd, it makes sense now why she won 'Supporting Actress', even though I just expected her to be in it more given the title and she does a reliably good job as well. I did find it a bit odd to just see her staring out the window from the caf, though, and honestly, while it brings up stereotypes with her as well, namely, just because she's a female doesn't mean she's a better parent, I really didn't like her character nearly as much as Dustin Hoffman's. I don't doubt that it happens because this world is huge, but no parent that I have ever met, that actually loves their child, would ever just leave their child for their own sake. Sure, she had to get out of a situation that made her unhappy, I get that, but she wrote to her son that, 'she's still a mommy but has other things to do?' Who writes that? Especially to their own child? You can still leave a bad situation and still attempt to see your own child, it's ridiculous. Justin Henry was great, it made me laugh that his name was Billy but seeing the effects that the split has on him is hard to watch and I'm also surprised he didn't wake up when the parents were arguing at the start. His relationship with his dad felt real, I was surprised when he said 'crap' but considering what his dad says later, it makes sense. All the other actors, especially the lawyers, no matter how big or small of a role, were excellent. The film is brought to life by an outstanding screenplay; I loved it so much, it was so real and filled with excellent dialogue that had your undivided attention. The way one of the early scenes end with the line, 'How much courage does it take to walk out on your kid?' just had me in awe of how powerful that line was, coupled with the excellent editing this film has as well. The film also had a pretty lively soundtrack that reminded me of a Wes Anderson film at points. It made me laugh that Hoffman's character talked about when someone says sorry, you should accept their apology because earlier on in the film there was a scene where the son kept saying sorry and he was still annoyed, but it made sense. There's also quite a lot of humour in this film as well, some of it was strange, when he is at an interview and he opens to door to a party on the other side, that just seemed crazy; and he should have said he wanted the job because he still wanted to work in that field! But there was a story being told at the start of the film that I still want to know how it ended! The build up to the eventual court case is brilliant, we see father and son finally making French Toast successfully and it made me smile. The scene where they all meet again in the park was nice for the son, I thought it'd have that moment where Hoffman would say, 'hey Billy look who it is', but that wouldn't really have fit and it was handled great. The court case showcases another example of fantastic dialogue and it's great to watch, even though it still bugs me that people blame, usually fathers, in films for being away all the time because they're working, it's not like he was being a deadbeat and he should have said he was let go from his job because of his son. It's really unfair how all that plays out, but then it leads up to a very smart and different ending. We can all relate to this film in some way as it hits home for pretty much every one of us, it's hard to watch at some points just because of how much Ted is struggling but still prioritises being a good father, and one scene where he has to run to the hospital was outstanding. While Coppola's work for 'Apocalypse Now' is some of the greatest filmmaking of all time, I guess they decided that a film about a family is more relatable as well as the fact that 'The Deer Hunter' did in fact win the year before, even though I don't agree with how The Academy chooses how what film wins. And regardless of all that, it is an overall excellently made film.

Jessica J (mx) wrote: My friends dad worked on this case....excellent movie!

Shawn S (ag) wrote: This has a great story and cast and has thrilling action sequences.

Vincent P (us) wrote: One of the most ingenious movies of ever? Yes!

Jacob M (nl) wrote: It's one of the most complex films ever made. A film directed by Sam Peckinpah, Major Dundee was intended to be a huge epic western, but since Peckinpah was a heavy drinker, the studio fired him and eliminated most of his material and released their version with negative reviews. After Peckinpah's death, the studio found most of Peckinpah's missing footage and restored it back into the film, releasing an "extended version". My experience of Major Dundee was this "extended version" and, while I can't say it's better than the theatrical version or not, Major Dundee is a clear reason why I'm not a super huge fan of the Western genre.Major Amos Dundee (Charlton Heston), a Union officer, is head of a Confederate prison in New Mexico. When Apache Indians abduct some young kids, Dundee hires a crew, including Confederate prisoners, led by Capt. Benjamin Tyreen (Richard Harris), an old friend of Dundee before turning Confederate, to find the Indians and retrieve the kids. What Dundee doesn't know is the quest will lead them down to Mexico and tensions between him and Ben will heat up higher.Other stars in the film include Jim Hutton as Lt. Graham. James Coburn as Samuel Potts, and Senta Berger as a Mexican widow who falls for Heston.If you look at the film closely, you'll see similarities to the Western classic The Searchers, a story about a crazed man racist towards an Indian race and looking for abducted children. The Searchers is a true Western classic, with an epic storyline, a spectacular performance from John Wayne, and filled with adventure, comedy, and drama. Major Dundee, on the other hand, fails miserably. Now I have to be honest, I loved the opening sequence, involving an Indian attack at a village and the burning of buildings. That sequence alone had potential that this was going to be a great film. But, shortly afterwards, the film goes downhill fast. For one thing, there's too many characters to count, and it's hard to care for people have been poorly developed. Take James Coburn for example. All he does in the film is make grand announcements to others, and his part was wasted. Jim Hutton was also a waste and I couldn't care for his character much. What makes The Searchers a great classic is how epic the journey is. In Major Dundee, however, the journey is dull, dull, dull, and dull. While the cinematography stuns, everything else falls flat. Even worse in the story, is that long before the halfway mark, an old Apache returns the kids to the army, so Dundee returns them home and continues to search for the Apaches. Well, if you got the kids back, then what's the point? In The Searchers, you had to wait until the end in order to see the kids, and the journey took five years. By the time the scene I mentioned happened, it hit an all-time low, and the film got worse and worse and worse.The other problem I had with the story is this; Why is the French in Mexico? The French had nothing to do with the story, so why are they the bad guys now? I thought that was racist. If people complain that The Searchers is racist, then this film is a whole lot worse.Charlton Heston is one of the best actors in his day. He excelled me, and others, as Moses in The Ten Commandments, and wowed in his Oscar-winning performance in Ben-Hur. In Major Dundee? He's the biggest problem. Heston was a huge miscast, and felt no sympathy for his character when making the quest. For one thing, Heston's character was so stupid that I'm surprised that he was ever a Union officer. I'd thought I'd never say this, but Richard Harrs's character, the Confederate leader, had more common sense than Heston's character, and I'm not a Confederate supporter. Harris had better acting than Heston, and was the only performance worth mentioning.Heston gets involved in a romance later in the film, and it bores. The film has some action sequences, and they bore as well. Most of them were filmed in the night, so most of the time, you can't tell what's going on. But when you can tell what's going on, the scenes are stupidly-crafted, boring, and lazy. Major Dundee is a big reason why I'm not a huge fan of the Western genre. It promises something epic and turns into a dull disappointment. The acting, with the exception of Richard Harris, is dull, the action sequences are poorly made, and the epic journey is a boring waste. I wasted two-and-a-half hours of my life watching this dull, racist, junk. If you want to watch a real Western, watch Rio Bravo. Watch The Searchers. Watch even The Magnificent Seven. Avoid Major Poopee at all costs, and you'll do a great favor to the whole world. The more it's avoided, the better.

daren y (ru) wrote: this an other awesome movie!