Looking for Lola

Looking for Lola

Looking for Lola is a comical look at the world of relationships and highlights just how far we will go to impress that special someone... Mike (Mark Kassen) has moved to L.A. with dreams of being a writer. In order to keep his parents satisfied, he lies to them, telling of his instant success and wealth as an author. Lola (Ara Celi) has dreams of being a dancer; however her illegal status in the country has left her looking after her sleazy boss' mansion. the hilarity begins after the two meet. Both weave an intricate set of lies, painting a picture of success and wealth, in an attempt to woo the other. However, when their parents decide to visit them in California, it becomes extremely challenging to keep the comical facade alive!

Looking for Lola is a comical look at the world of relationships and highlights just how far we will go to impress that special someone... Mike (Mark Kassen) has moved to L.A. with dreams of being a writer. In order to keep his parents satisfied, he lies to them, telling of his instant success and wealth as an author. Lola (Ara Celi) has dreams of being a dancer; however her illegal status in the country has left her looking after her sleazy boss' mansion. the hilarity begins after the two meet. Both weave an intricate set of lies, painting a picture of success and wealth, in an attempt to woo the other. However, when their parents decide to visit them in California, it becomes extremely challenging to keep the comical facade alive! . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Looking for Lola torrent reviews

Eloisa Rae A (gb) wrote: Well-written. Another good work by the Duplass bros.

Dustin D (gb) wrote: Strange to see a dumb stoner comedy from another country. I appreciated seeing American pop culture parodied and sent back to us with off-beat humor. I especially liked the cheesy catch phrases. I'm not sure if rating this movie is fair since I haven't seen enough Indian movies to have any frame for comparison.

graham l (fr) wrote: Not the hip hop film I expected. Better story than Sugarman!

Sherry M (au) wrote: This was a terrible movie. Nothing happens. The protagonist (played by the author of both the book and the movie) whines and drinks. The dialogue isn't funny at all. Susanne constantly throws shit fits a seven year old would be ashamed. Of people with real jobs, i.e.: her lawyer and the baristas she demands complete attention and emotional support. Disappointingly, Cathryn Michon isn't even fat. All the black characters in this movie are depicted weird/psychotic. None of the political commentary is fresh or insightful. In fact, I'm pretty sure Michon stole the message from a Dove Deodorant commercial. Muffin Top is self indulgent rich white feminist garbage.

Aaron S (mx) wrote: One of the best illustrations of how and why America became so divided politically in spite of a fairly moderate majority. I'm giving the fifth star, however, to the solutions provided towards the end pertaining to already existing agencies working to make our government about the issues and not the money.

Graham B (mx) wrote: Gay painter Guy and Straight builder Doug meet on a park bench and strike up a conversation that leads into a no strings fling. No strings on the long term turns out to be pretty stringy and a most complicated relationship is forged.Adapted from a stage play in the slightest of ways as it is all shot as a play on a sound stage, which I found an uncinematic cop out. The initial part is quite compelling, but the two leads eventually left me rather cold. I didn't really grasp their chemistry and the staged balletic posed sex scene was laughable.It looks like it would be a great play to see on the stage. I just think this was lazy adaptation that could have been much much better if adapted properly for the screen.

Benjamin W (it) wrote: An interesting idea that was kind of a mix between "24" and " Dead Poets Society". The occasional split screens definitely was an artistic choice that worked for this film.

David B (gb) wrote: Cheesy, cliche and predictable.

Justin O (es) wrote: I wanna knockaround Vin Diesel's balls in my mouth! Hey dude!

Brian P (br) wrote: Pretty bad, pretty terrible, pretty horrible. Do I need to say anymore then that?

Andr D (nl) wrote: Shelley Long, buscando triunfar en su carrera como actriz de cine, abandona la television y se entrega a esta desastrosa pelicula, poco graciosa y altamente olvidable. Shelley quien?

Aaron B (au) wrote: One thing...this movie's star wasn't even born in 1927, supposedly when this film came out.

carolann H (gb) wrote: Excellent movie love it !!!! I know its loosely based on his true story but I just love this movie, book is better though but movie still brilliant

Roland S (us) wrote: Having Kong fight Mechani-Kong on the Tokyo Tower is a nice break from the typical city-stomping action.

Ilsa L (de) wrote: Fritz Lang's scathing indictment of the American judicial system.

Edith N (ca) wrote: Most people, I think, are unaware of the fact both versions of this are, at least loosely, based on a couple of real cases. Now, I don't know how closely the cases align to the story, but it doesn't really matter. After all, the story isn't really about the cases. It's true that Roxie Hart is, in both cases, being prosecuted for the murder of her boyfriend, Fred Casely. (Velma Kelly is only in one version, though there are similar characters in [i]Roxie Hart[/i].) However, the story is the publicity, not the murder itself. That the murder itself rapidly becomes irrelevant is the whole point, isn't it? So okay. In [i]Roxie Hart[/i], Roxie has not killed anyone. Her husband starts by confessing, then accuses her. This part is true in both versions, as is the fact that she becomes the latest celebrity murderess in the Cook County jail. It's suddenly fashionable to be like her. She gets an astonishing amount of publicity, and it's generally considered impossible for her to be convicted; Cook County does not, they say, kill women. (We all know that Illinois doesn't kill [i]anyone[/i] these days, but never mind.) In [i]Chicago[/i], we see one woman actually get hanged--even though, as it happens, Illinois had moved over to the electric chair by then. Either way, if Roxie isn't acquitted, she will be on Death Row, not a happy place. So she declares she's pregnant. [i]Chicago[/i] is the better telling of the story, and it's not just because there's more singing and dancing. (Yes, than in a Ginger Rogers movie. But it [i]is[/i] based on Fosse.) It's not even just that the singing and dancing is better, though it is. Ginger's one musical number is just her dancing with a bunch of reporters, and none of the guys are good dancers. It's the limitations of the Code. Roxie has greater limits placed on her in [i]Roxie Hart[/i], because she doesn't have to be the foul-mouthed, bitter, [i]actual murderess[/i] that we get in [i]Chicago[/i], both the movie and the original play. I mean, Ginger Rogers can't be a murderess either way, because she is, in fact, Ginger Rogers. It's one of the few places where I think Renee Zellweger is perfectly cast, because we can [i]believe[/i] her as the frankly dumb, petty, selfish Roxie. Rogers's Roxie is too sweet. I'm not buying it. So let's get down to specifics. [i]Roxie Hart[/i], the first chronologically, is a saccharine little tale. Roxie is willing to confess to the crime and even be put on trial because she thinks the acquittal will help her show business career. When "Two-Gun Gertie" comes into prison, Roxie announces a pregnancy to get her publicity back (another area that both movies have in common, though the woman who sparks it is different--probably because the one in [i]Chicago[/i] involves cohabitation). She's naive, but she's not terribly brassy, if you will. This is a Roxie that wouldn't have an affair if she wanted to; she can't even really flirt with a guy unless her divorce comes through. At that, she can't get into a relationship unless that, too, implies marriage. In [i]Chicago[/i], we have not only the implied Roxie of previous paragraphs but a second focus of Velma Kelly as well. Velma is Catherine Zeta-Jones, and she is delightfully wicked. She claims to have blacked out the murders she's in jail over, but she gives an aura of reliving them quietly and happily in the privacy of her own head when the lights go out. The loss of the Code also permits us to let both women really violate real laws. Velma is perfectly open about the fact that she, her husband, and her sister were [i]breaking the law[/i]. After all, this story is set during Prohibition. Velma says, in so many words, that they were having a few drinks. Various of the other women violated the same laws. There's astonishing corruption in that prison. And Billy Flynn, who admits in both to not caring if someone is guilty or not, is shown as a jerk in both, but he's a [i]likable[/i] jerk, because he's allowed to be, in this. In case you needed another reason to be against the Code, I encourage you to compare these two movies. The one that didn't have to worry about the Code, that gave up and went for the PG-13, is more clever and more entertaining. I don't care about the swearing; let's leave the swearing out of this and look at the things that really ran up against the Code. Okay--Roxie gets away with murder. But does anyone [i]really[/i] want to be anything like her? Or do she and Velma both pretty much give you the creeps? Sure, you want a Billy Flynn to take your side, but as I said, Billy's kind of a jerk in both. The thing is, Roxie sells because [i]sex[/i] sells, and the Roxie of [i]Roxie Hart[/i] isn't sexy.

holly r (jp) wrote: very funny. I enjoyed it very much.

Eric R (it) wrote: If you look closely at the film credits one will find a few things to raise any film fans eyebrows. The urban violence plotline is written and produced by usually family friendly Robert Zemekis (Back to the Future, Polar Express) and directed by tough-man film expert Walter Hill. Zemekis and Hill together? Mix that with a cast that includes Bill Paxton and Ice Cube and you have a bizarre liquor that will make any drunk take at least one shot.Our plot opens with two redneck firefighters (Paxton & Sadler) who are given a treasure a map by a man trapped in a burning building who then commits suicide (which is a very bizarre, almost unintentionally funny sequence). Doing research they find the guy stole a shit load of gold from a catholic church and hid it in a factory... the only problem is that the factory is now abandoned and located in a very dangerous section of St. Louis. While looking for the gold, Paxton witness a gang murder and gang leader King James (Ice-T) and his posse trap them a room (with King James' brother as a hostage) and it's a tense struggle to get out alive, with the treasure of gold if possible.Walter Hill's direction is the strong point of this film as he makes are rather simple story tense and suspenseful. He also crafts a lot of claustrophobia by having most of the major sequences take place within the confines of the abandoned factory's walls. I also dug some of Hill's hand-held black and white shots from the gang camera which also added to the tension. The colorful cast is great especially Ice-T and William Sadler. Sadler never got any respect as an actor and it's a damn shame as he plays the money hungry down-on-his luck burnt-out firefighter wonderfully. He made me believe he was willing to kill anybody in order to get his gold. Paxton, on the other hand, tended to annoy me. That's a damn shame also as I usually like Paxton. I can't blame him as it could be how his character is written and his portrayal and character is just wishy washy. I also wasn't impressed with Art Evans' vagrant and his character spent most of the film tied up in a chair spotting off profanity. The film would have been much more suspenseful if it was only up to the wits of Sandler and Paxton without this leftover character shouting from a chair.Despite some character issues and a thin plot I found this "two worlds collide" action film to have plenty of edge of your seat sequences and a likable cast. Some of the serious sequences can come out a little campy but thankfully Trespass came out better than most of Hill's other late 80's and early 90's action outings, namely "Red Heat" and "Another 48 Hrs."

Jordan C (au) wrote: One of my favorites as a kid.