Lord Jim

Lord Jim

After being discredited as a coward, a 19th century seaman (Peter O'Toole) lives for only one purpose: to redeem himself. Based on Joseph Conrad's novel written in 1900.

Based on Joseph Conrad's novel written in 1900. Lord Jim is a Technicolor adventure film made by Columbia Pictures in Super Panavision. After being discredited as a coward, a 19th century seaman (Peter O'Toole) lives for only one purpose: to redeem himself. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Lord Jim torrent reviews

Sam M (es) wrote: Very clever and fun, if you don't understand Woody you probably won't like it much.

Candice M (br) wrote: Intriguing and delightful movie.

Khaled H (br) wrote: weird and unusual but magnetically mesmerizing

Luke s (mx) wrote: From the brilliant minds of Caroline, comes a follow up that deliever just as much as the spooky quircks that can entertain kids and parents.

Sam M (fr) wrote: Like a docudrama, but completely non-fiction, this shows the heart and soul of the late driver and also could be used as an introduction to the world of Formula One.

Elisa M (mx) wrote: (the Miike's one) i wish that hand wasn't that ridiculous.

Leo S (us) wrote: Why do you need so many hair dryers?

Maarrk H (de) wrote: Fine. I get it. It's like 'Fight Club' meets 'Dances With Wolves'. Too bad it feels like a 90-minute version of 'Deliverance's rape scenes. Greene chews the scenery, and the other characters are drawn with wide strokes lacking any nuance. Shame.

Blais E (mx) wrote: Fun and much-ballyhooed fourth sequel to Universal's classic "Frankenstein" series and the second appearance of "The Wolfman", here pairing the two titular monsters in a kinetic, yet long-in-coming, and disappointingly short throwdown at film's end. The majority of the flick is concerned with whiny but sympathetic Lawrence Talbot's (A beefy and bloated Lon Chaney, Jr.-) desperate attempts to find a cure for his wolfish affliction, until he stumbles across a frozen-Frankie (Bela Lugosi as a suitably ornery and de-humanized monster-). While atmittedly, Boris Karloff definitely owned the part, I have always liked Lugosi's interpretation of the monster and have felt it is under-appreciated and unjustly maligned. Maria Ouspenskaya reprises her role as Maleva, the wizened Gypsy from the previous "Wolfman", and Patric Knowles, Lionel Atwill, Rex Evans, and the beauteous Ilona Massey are also along for the ride. Enjoyable and riddled with Universal's typically-thick horror-atmosphere, the opening scene with the grave-robbers being particularly memorable.