Love & Basketball

Love & Basketball

A young African-American couple navigates the tricky paths of romance and athletics in this drama. Quincy McCall (Omar Epps) and Monica Wright (Sanaa Lathan) grew up in the same neighborhood and have known each other since childhood. As they grow into adulthood, they fall in love, but they also share another all-consuming passion: basketball. They've followed the game all their lives and have no small amount of talent on the court. As Quincy and Monica struggle to make their relationship work, they follow separate career paths though high school and college basketball and, they hope, into stardom in big-league professional ball.

In 1981 in L.A., Monica moves in next door to Quincy. They're 11, and both want to play in the NBA, just like Quincy's dad. Their love-hate relationship lasts into high school, with Monica's edge and Quincy's top-dog attitude separating them, except when Quincy's parents argue and he climbs through Monica's window to sleep on the floor. As high school ends, they come together as a couple, but within a year, with both of them playing ball at USC, Quincy's relationship with his father takes an ugly turn, and it leads to a break up with Monica. Some years later, their pro careers at a crossroads, they meet again. It's time for a final game of one-on-one with high stakes. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Love & Basketball torrent reviews

Brad S (ca) wrote: I was pretty disappointed in this latest effort from Tim Burton. The story isn't great, the film is too long, and it just seems disconnected from the type of fantasy stuff he used to do with more heart. I really just didn't enjoy this film and found it rather creepy for a "family" movie, which of course he is known for but this time it lacks his usual passion. I think it is the overuse of CGI. When he works on stop-motion animated films, you can feel and see the passion, but it is lost in the heavy CGI infused film like this, "Dark Shadows" and "Alice in Wonderland." Skip it.

Kale H (ru) wrote: A whole ton of gory fun!

preetesh p (ca) wrote: Quite good one...Bips rocks!!

Joshua S (de) wrote: While I didn't learn anything new, the home movie footage and the interviews were spectacular. I highly recommend this movie.

Griffin H (nl) wrote: Not as good as the first one and not very funny. a movie that could have been good but not pulled off.

Conrad H (us) wrote: Wildly crazy. Don't expect a coherent movie but just enjoy the vignettes, which can be inconsistent in terms of quality. I don't think I spotted all the film allusions.

David B (br) wrote: Great early noir. Amazing visuals.

Art S (br) wrote: Come and meet those dancing feet! The original "backstage musical" where the whole plot is about putting on a show, from auditions for the chorus girls (including nave Ruby Keeler) to the out-of-town opening (Philadelphia) and everything in between. Sure, the harried director, sugar-daddy money man, nervous producers, the juvenile lead (Dick Powell) and wise-cracking performers (including Ginger Rogers) have become stock characters, but this film set them up. More importantly, it was the first smash hit to showcase the choreography of Busby Berkeley, in which the chorus girls are often filmed in abstract geometric formations. Although 42nd Street was the major hit, I might prefer Gold Diggers of 1933 (more freaky) or Footlight Parade (with Cagney) - also from 1933. Great fun!

Michael M (de) wrote: This movie was pretty insane and surprisingly awesome for something so low-budget. I definitely got chills twice and I was impressed with how much of a mindf*ck this movie turned into. If you're into scary movies, you'll want to add this to your queue.

John G (us) wrote: There are terrors that lurk in the heart of everyday, mundane life. Real terrors, not contrived boogeymen made up to sell tickets, not jump scares that always fail to redeem a mindless horror flick. It is a rare gen of a movie that can somehow distill some of that true terror between the opening and closing credits. Take Shelter is just one of those rare gems.