Mappillai

Mappillai

Saravanan (Dhanush) is a do-gooder, who is soft-spoken and admired by one and all. He comes across Gayathri (Hansika Motwani), daughter of arrogant business woman Rajeshwari (Manisha Koirala) and falls for her. Coming to know of their affair, Rajeshwari decides to get them both married. The reason is- she is keen on getting a son-in-law, who will always do what she wants and be under her control. But she in for a shock when she comes to know that Saravanan has a past. He is a ruffian and is feared by one and all. Now she plans to halt all plans, while Saravanan takes up the challenge and ensures that he end up marrying his lady love.

Saravanan (Dhanush) is a do-gooder, who is soft-spoken and admired by one and all. He comes across Gayathri (Hansika Motwani), daughter of arrogant business woman Rajeshwari (Manisha Koirala) and falls for her. Coming to know of their affair, Rajeshwari decides to get them both married. The reason is- she is keen on getting a son-in-law, who will always do what she wants and be under her control. But she in for a shock when she comes to know that Saravanan has a past. He is a ruffian and is feared by one and all. Now she plans to halt all plans, while Saravanan takes up the challenge and ensures that he end up marrying his lady love. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Mappillai torrent reviews

Anton T (br) wrote: Little movie about the complex reality of being a immigrant stranded in a world of bounty and ignorance...

Bartek F (ru) wrote: Canadian filmmaker Yung Chang's National Film Board of Canada-sponsored documentary about the displacement of the Yangtze river and the population surrounding it by the Three Gorges Dam in China creates a vivid picture of people and transitions. But it's got a tough act to follow in the films of Jia Zhang-ke, whose recent 'Still Life' goes over similar ground in a style that feels at once more sweeping and more intimate. Chang mainly alternates between a big "luxury cruise" boat that takes North Americans and Europeans to see the river landscape before flooding changes everything, and a poor family living in an improvised riverside shack that's shabby but is in a place where there is land they can cultivate for food. In the course of the film, the family is moved up to temporary housing where they have to buy food and water and their sixteen-year-old daughter, who wanted to continue beyond middle school, struggles and makes her way up from dishwasher to dining room help on the boat. Meanwhile Chang also follows another new boat worker called "Jerry" (Chen Bu Yu) who washes out after his trial period despite being handsome and a good singer. He is accused by his supervisor of being over-confident, egotistical, and careless of others, which some Chinese think is a common byproduct of one-child families. The farewell cruises are undoubtedly opportunistic, but bemoaning the presence of rich tourists who are not socially conscious, if thats Changs point, is naive and, dramatically, it doesnt provide enough depth to sustain a feature film. The dam promises to transition China from its dependence on coal, but Chang doesnt spend much time explaining the controversy surrounding it. The human toll is explored, briefly, in the most effective sequences of the documentary, when Chang films Yu Shui and her peasant family. Dubbed Cindy by her employers, the young woman is compelled to work on the cruise boat to relieve some of her familys financial burdens. The rising river put her father out of work, and soon it will also subsume their makeshift hut. With all these lyrical elements in play, Changs extraneous voiceover narration is baffling, and all but unbearable. A Chinese-Canadian, he interjects, with pretentious authority, anecdotes about his grandfathers life in China. This self-absorbed move shows a lack of awareness for the power of his own film. In one interview, a merchant who was forced to relocate bursts into tears and explains, Being a human is hard, but being a common person in China is even more difficult. Surely a moment like this, which is supposedly what documentary filmmaking is all about, expresses truth in a way no pre-fabricated speech about the beauty of the old Yangtze could ever hope to. I simply believe that Chang, as a filmmaker, doesn't have a steady balance of form or style. Unevenly audition different methods of filmmaking into one piece. Subject outweighs the film. Two stars out of four.

Dyron W (de) wrote: Mostly boring and pointless from what I remembered.

Cecilie G (br) wrote: A very dramatic and interesting movie.

Eric R (us) wrote: A very interesting work of Godards. I really liked the whole idea of body and soul and the dialogue was as usual for a godard film, brilliant. I still much prefer Godards earlier work.

Scott H (es) wrote: The transition film of the franchise.

Arai A (es) wrote: An immensely enjoyable thrill ride, but also an occasionally frustrating and short adaptation.

Christopher B (au) wrote: This was disappointing, rather dull.

Holly V (kr) wrote: It was good for a rental. It's funny how any movie that has any Christianity at all involved - the critics for liberal newspapers absolutely hate it. It was a decent movie, a little confusing in the beginning but it pans out. Very sad.