Modlitba pro Katerinu Horovitzovou

Modlitba pro Katerinu Horovitzovou

A group of wealthy American Jewish businessmen have been captured by the SS and are told that they are to be traded to the American army for several SS officers. However, these hostages are...

A group of wealthy American Jewish businessmen have been captured by the SS and are told that they are to be traded to the American army for several SS officers. However, these hostages are... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Modlitba pro Katerinu Horovitzovou torrent reviews

Peter M (gb) wrote: Lucky One in the Chamber didnt get one star...entertainment is present but every other aspect of a movie is absent.

Ian C (au) wrote: Hostage drama/comedy written and directed by Martin Donovan and co-starring the under rated and always excellent David Morse

Cory B (gb) wrote: Saw this at one of Oscilloscope's Circle of Trust screening things... a cool little program. The film on the other hand... lots of mediocre stuff going on wrapped up in a really hard to understand bundle. Good ideas that are not fleshed out to their full potential... great imagery, great improv, so-so direction and editing. Interested to see how this fares review-wise come March when it's released.

Rob J (mx) wrote: It's no Last Waltz but it's okay, providing you like Pearl Jam

Michael G (de) wrote: Im i the only fuck drunk enough to watch this movie, Great porn-grade acting.

Reeta B (it) wrote: WHO KNEW BEST FRIENDS COULD BE BITCHES. awesomely dark.

Deen F (mx) wrote: This is my favorite movie :)

Cameron J (es) wrote: Now, I'm not saying that European artists are kind of crazy, but Hitler was known to paint from time to time, and while that isn't to say that Vincent van Gogh was as crazy as Hitler, it is to say that he has mutilated himself for some girl he had a crush on, and that's all that needs to be said. Well, I don't know about any other kind of European artist, but the French appear to be insane when it comes to the art filmmaking, what with all of their weird and melodramatic experiments with storytelling, which is why this film's writer and director, Maurice Pialat, is trying something different by keeping things realist and, by extension, kind of dull. No, people, this film isn't really all that bland, or at least it isn't up until an admittedly kind of dull final act, and not just because you can't help but wonder just how slow the final product would have been if it was yet another overly arty French filmmaking mess, but the fact of the matter is that real life isn't too terribly exciting, even when the real life you're meditating upon is that of a somewhat disturbed... Dutch painter of the 19th century. Well, shoot, now that I think about it, this film's subject matter doesn't even sound all that exciting on paper, so I reckon that's why Pialat got Jacques Dutronc, a French pop-rock star, to play van Gogh, as he hoped that Dutronc would get people to think of delightful French diddies to keep them from getting too bored, which would be great and all if it wasn't for the fact that I kept expecting van Gogh to bust out an acoustic guitar and start singing "Et Moi, Et Moi, Et Moi". I wonder whose facial expression is the most hilarious: that of the few people who think that I'm serious about expecting a van Gogh musical number, or that of the countless people who have absolutely no idea who in the world I'm talking about. So yeah, Dutronc was essentially the French Bob Dylan, and then he moved into being the French Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd, then your regular old traditional French pop-rock star, then a French crooner, then, I don't know, the prime minister of France or something, and now, well, I don't know what he's up to. Quite frankly, I don't carry, just as long as he's still a good actor, because he sure could carry a film as sure as he can carry a note, and yet, with that said, it's not like this film can fully paint over its problems.Don't let this film's fairly broad title fool you, as this film chronicles, not the full life and times of the late, great Vincent van Go, but the painter's notorious last 67 days, during which an enging story is found, though, in this film, not quite as fleshed out as it probably should be, for although we're all hopefully aware of Vincent van Gogh, and although I'm not asking that this film crowbar more material into its already overlong two-and-a-half-hour runtime to give more flesh-out to our characters, the film feels underdeveloped. Sure, eventual exposition does a decent job of getting you used to the happenings and humans who drive this drama, while Maurice Pialat's realist atmosphere further bonds you with the film's humanity, but more immediate flesh-out stands to be more abundant, because as things stand, development shortcomings in this film do damage to engagement value, which further suffers at the hands of the very realist approach that helps in compensating for exposition issues. There's only so much dramatic kick to this dramatization of a dramatic period (Drama, drama, drama and more drama), as Pialat wishes to not water down subjet matter of this type with histrionics and articifial emotional resonance, and more often than not this dramatic formula works, but it's not without its problems, including an atmosphere that isn't as dry as I feared, - thanks to reasonably spirited writing and acting keeping entertainment value up, at least to a certain extent - but not exactly frantic, being just restrained enough to, after a while, lose you, at least momentarily. If this film's atmospheric slow spells do nothing else, they call more to attention the film's biggest issue: padding, because at 158 minutes of only one segment out of a story that is undoubtedly rich with dramatic potential, this film outstays its welcome a bit, reinforcing realism with the occasional needless moment of nothingness, if not more than a few moments in which material gets to be a bit too fatty around the edges, typically of a somewhat familiar nature. It's not monotonous, but this film's excessive formula gets to be repetitious, leaving the film to wander along, seemingly in circles, with enough intrigue to keep you compelled through and through, though not with enough dynamic kick to keep you really locked in. This film is a very human one, and I commend it for having such humanity, and spicing it all up with an active attention to genuineness over melodrama, but much too often, this film's realist meandering goes a bit too far, slowing down the momentum of the film, both in atmospheric pacing and plot structure, but still not taking as much time as it probably should to really flesh things out, and that does a number on the final product. Of course, when it's all said and done, the film's issues, while undeniable, aren't quite as considerable as they could have been, so it's not like you should go into this film expecting the usual underwhelming misfire you can find on a list of Cannes Film Festival highlights, but rather, a genuinely rewarding film, with effectiveness than can be found even within the smallest of aspects.Actively resistent against overly cinematic sensibilities, this film very rarely plays up musiciality, which, upon actually coming up, outside of a nice little jingle at the credits, is found, not in post-production, but in first-party audio, something that is, as you can imagine, rarely accompanied by the piano and occasional band that drive what musical aspects there are in this film, so it's not like this film is driven by its soundtrack, but when music is, in fact, played up, it makes its limited time with us count by livening up atmosphere, though not so much so that Pialat contradicts his noable realist intentions. These musical moments, as well as all too limited occasions in which cinematographers Gilles Henry and Emmanuel Machuel find an attractive visual to play up, are rather rarely explored in this opus whose artistic value is most driven by storytelling artistry, but they are here, punching up the engagement value behind a story that is strong enough to carry itself on its own, as reflected by the fact that it, well, mostly has to carry itself on its own. There's not a whole lot of build-up to this particularly intriguing final chapter to an intriguing life, yet that doesn't stop the chapter in question for running a touch too long, but no matter how underdeveloped or overlong this film's story is, it is intriguing on paper, alone, with plenty of dramatic potential that isn't too extensively played up, but played up just enough within Maurice Pialat's clever script for you to gain an adequate understanding of this film's characterization and progression. Pialat's writing isn't outstanding, but it is commendable in its wit and realism, which helps in bringing the intriguing behind this film's worthy subject matter to life, and is itself brought to life by inspiration with Pialat's direction, whose restraint all too often does damage to pacing and atmospheric bite, but all but works wonders when heavier material falls into play and is not overplayed, but rather presented with enough inimtate genuineness for you to bond with the film's happenings and dramatic aspects, no matter how realistically restrained they are. No, people, the film won't exactly be jamming on your heartstrings, as this is not that kind of film that would play up cinematic dramatic touches, going driven by a very realist genuineness that could have been executed all wrong and left you utterly distanced from the final product, but is ultimately backed by enough inspiration for you to be sold on this world. What further sells you on the humanity behind this very human drama is, of course, the acting, which is strong in most everyone, but arguably at its strongest within leading man Jacques Dutronc, who, even then, isn't given a whole lot to work with, thanks to this film's being relatively held back in its portrayal of Vincent van Gogh's infamous mental and emotional health issues, but convinces consistently as the legendary artist, and when material is, in fact, called in, Dutronc plays with effective emotional range to further convince you of the layers and depths behind this brilliant and unstable soul. The film isn't thoroughly enthralling, nor is it even as powerful as it probably would have been if it was tighter, more fleshed out and - dare I say it? - more celebratory of dramatic aspects, rather than entirely realist, but where this effort could have fallen flat as underwhelming and too carried away with its uniqueness, like so many other meditative dramas you find at Cannes, inspiration behind restrained artistry proves to be compelling enough to make this film a reward one.When the final stroke comes, you're left with a portrait of Vincent van Gogh that stands to take more time with immediate development, and less time meditating on excess material that is made all the worse by a somewhat dryly slow atmospheric pacing, and sparks the repetition that could have driven the final product into underwhelmingness, but is ultimately battled back enough to keep you compelled, because whether it be spawned from such ever so rare atmospheric compliments as lovely music, or spawned from inspired writing, direction and writing that bring an intriguingly worthy story to life, there is enough kick to engagement value to make Maurice Pialat's "Van Gogh" a surprisingly consistently engaging realist drama that may have its natural shortcomings, but ultimately stands as worth watching.3/5 - Good

Gii B (fr) wrote: OMG this film left me so frustrated to the max! Fantastic cast, story and acting but what went wrong? I can only assume that the director was focusing on all the wrong parts of the film. I just know if the right person (step in Mike Leigh) got his hands on this little (possibly wonderful) piece of film that it would be genius! I(TM)ve never wanted to slap a film more!! What a shame. The real stars of the movie were Lesley Manville and Bob Hoskins who were just a joy to watch and more time spent on their story would have certainly given the film that much needed grounding that it lacked. As for Stockard Channing, well I could watch her in anything. All in all it(TM)s a hard film to rate because all the elements were there, it just didn(TM)t deliver with that knockout punch it could have.

Linnea N (fr) wrote: I don't think I've seen a movie with S.P that I don't like

George R (nl) wrote: Gable, Gardner & Grace Kelly, filmed on a safari. Love triangle--meow! Best quote: "Let me jump to my own conclusions!" Another 31 Days of Oscar on TCM.

David L (es) wrote: How Green Was My Valley has beautiful cinematography, magnificent ending and some moving moments, but it is also tedious at times with too many singing and preaching monologues making it a passable film certainly not worth the highest honor of Best Picture foolishly bestowed upon it.

Abdullah A (kr) wrote: This film is so much better than people give it credit for. Don't listen to the people saying it doesn't make sense or it doesn't have an ending or whatever. Look, this film isn't really for everyone, because it's slow-paced and not a lot is happening all the time, but certain things are undeniably great about this film, like the acting and the cinematography and the soundtrack and the REALISM. This film really surprised me in it that it's not at all "hollywoodized". It's purely just real. It reveals human nature in a way that not a lot of films do, as in, people are more complicated that we give them credit for, and they act certain ways for a number of reasons that we just won't know on the getgo. In the beginning of the film, you'll probably find yourself annoyed with a lot of characters, but as you learn more about them and realize that there's more to them than what you first saw, you kind of feel bad for judging them. There is also the interesting (to me at least) way the film shows how a father and mother and this isolated society act in times of crises like this, and gives perspective on social behavior and the psychology of the people involved. My only small nitpicks about this film is that some scenes I wish they had long static shots of the characters, like in Shame if you ever saw that film, because it would've fit better than cutting between the faces of the people, but other than that, this is a well made film. Don't go into this film with any "pre-judgements", because it's likely not correct. All that I can say is this is not an action packed film. It's not really a thriller. It's not a fantastical plot. It's slow and steady and real.