Pusinky

Pusinky

Iska, Karolína, and Vendula are eighteen-year-old girls who have just graduated from high school. Not wanting to let go of their carefree student lives or their friendship, they plan to ...

A group of adolescent girls and young brother of one of them hitch-hike in an adventurous quest in summer weather through the Czech landscape... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Pusinky torrent reviews

Greg W (nl) wrote: Watch this movie! Is a bit cheesy in parts, but received way too much criticism for that. Overall a really interesting story that I didn't know about, and has some great sequences.

James P (ca) wrote: the story was pretty borderline... but that motherfucker deserves to be stabbed... haha

Tommi L (de) wrote: I thought the twist at the end made it better than your average teen slasher. Felt sorry for the kid and realized what a monster the dad was at the end!

Andrew K (ru) wrote: I wonder if Jack Black has ever been in a movie where he hasn't said "Boo dap a do de boop" at least once. Some good laughs

Fernanda L (de) wrote: Bobinho. E eu achando que ia ser um filme cabea estranho filmado toscamente com um propsito filosfico que eu nunca conseguiria entender. E s uma comdia! O pior que eu ainda ouo o som das gargalhadas dentro da minha cabea na cena do "e quinta-feira eu tenho dentista.".

Ken T (au) wrote: Themost retarded sci fi "B" flick ever...

Ivan D (ag) wrote: Adolescent sexuality. It's a theme too sensitive and downright naive to really expose in such a raw, disturbing and depressing light. Yet that's actually what director Catherine Breillat has done in "Fat Girl": A thorough exploration of early sexual awakening, abstract sibling relationships and artificial promiscuity that ultimately leads into disintegration. I really think that with a more light-handed filmmaker, the theme could have been made and executed as a bittersweet tale of gullible love seen through the eyes of a fertile and curious girl. But given that a sensible approach to the issues tackled by the film is much more preferable, "Fat Girl" neglected all of these and instead hovered around its characters with detached apathy. And putting an ambiguous, fantasizing, ennui-stricken female character in its center both as an observant and observed does not just complicate the matter, it also puts the film into a critical extremity. Call it depressing, call it exploitative, but by all means, "Fat Girl" delivered what it has intended to, and also puts into exposition and emphasis those that should have been otherwise. And just like Gaspar Noe's works, the film has displayed uncommon bravery.The film is chiefly about the relationship between 15-year-old Elena (Roxane Mesquida) and her sister Anais (Anais Reboux in a very daring performance). The opening scene, after we heard Anais' haunting song and saw her dead set stare, we are introduced to the relational condition of the siblings. We hear the words 'fat slob' and 'loose morals' hurled at each other devoid of any verbal emotions. They walk shoulder to shoulder through the woods and into the streets but they're of the opposite looks and mindsets. Anais, an overweight girl, states that first-time sex should be with anybody, while Elena, a beautiful 'Lolita-like' teenager, suggests the generalized importance and pleasures of 'sleeping' around with many. It's a conversation captured with such normality and spontaneity that it makes it more disquieting. How did such girls at a tender age know too much and very opinionated about things they shouldn't be hearing about in the first place? Catherine Breillat brings us into an alternate reality of France where it's not all about the elegance of love and romance, but a washed-out place (both in color and moral fiber) where the idea of sex is messy and sudden while the concept of virginity is not about its preservation but to whom it must be lost and why. "Fat Girl" also delves into sexuality to which physical carnality is endlessly fantasized while the context of true love contained within it is superficial at best. As I hear the narcissistic Fernando's (Libero De Rienzo) promises to Elena as he fondles her virginal body, it sickens me. Through that specific sequence, Breillat also gives out a statement about how sweetened, unfulfilled pledges is an easy way 'in' into cheap romances and also the easiest way out. Yet the essence of the sisters' relationship does not start and end on sexual commentaries. We are also compelled to notice the sisters' 'love-hate' connection. One sequence, we see them throw dry insults at each other as if they have a scorned relational void rotten by time. But in the next, they suddenly hug each other. Insult, hate, laugh, laugh, hate, insult. It's their cycle, but is there an absolute? What is the true weather of their bond? "Fat Girl" presented it with such disfigured profundity (highlighted by how Elena and Anais recalled their childhood and how they compare themselves in front of a mirror) that it seems futile to look deep enough and as if both of them locked up the answers and covered it up with their one-bit fantasies. Graphic and at times, emotionally disorienting, this is the antithesis to shallow teenage films talking about 'cute guys' and 'first dates', "Fat Girl" rests upon a dark truth within adolescent existence; 'truth' which do not just come like a gentle revelation, but one bent on shattering the windshields of escapism to present us with certain uncomfortable notions, but those that are ultimately in touch with reality. The film is widely known to have a very 'controversial' and 'shocking' ending. I do not like hype, but "Fat Girl's" final sequence lives up to its notoriety. Quite ironic considering that it's about victory.

Peter F (nl) wrote: Jean-Luc Godard's highly innovative debut film was groundbreaking for its age, and while it may not feel as novel today, it's certainly just as enjoyable as ever. Inspired by American crime dramas, but told through an unconventional narrative propelled by an adventurous editing style, Breathless is certainly weird, but it's plot is fully contiguous. The dialogue in the film still sparkles to this day, which references both pop-culture and high art, and the film sublimely blurs the divide between American and French culture like virtually no other existing film. The French New Wave didn't start here, but Godard certainly made the style a whole lot cooler!

molly o (br) wrote: Although there are at least 50 good reasons to see this film, the rosary job in the cathedral should be enough to satisfy anyone... Consider Christ on the cross! :)

Fekry Y (kr) wrote: It is a realy nice movie