Scenes from a Mall

Scenes from a Mall

A comedy about a married couple -- he's a sports lawyer, she's a psychologist -- which takes place on their 16th wedding anniversary, when they make some startling confessions.

On their 16th anniversary a married couple's trip to a Beverly Hills mall becomes the stage for personal revelations and deceptions. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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Scenes from a Mall torrent reviews

David V (nl) wrote: It is pretty awful. I can't believe the stars in it. Is it a comedy?

Susan G (kr) wrote: Maybe ...Saw the story o 60 minutes

Greg W (mx) wrote: feels like a b movie but performances here rise above the mediorche material.

Nick J (ca) wrote: Not what i expected it to be

Ze F (it) wrote: I have to say that Morgan Freeman and Paz Vega give light to this movie. If it wasn't for the acting of these 2 fantastic artists, I honestly don't know how the movie would come out...Extremely boring maybe? Nevertheless, it's something you can watch when there's nothing else to see.

Lauri M (jp) wrote: very interesting topic. i would've liked to hear more direct feedback from the"pros" to aspiring people.

Bjorn O (nl) wrote: Om du bara ska se en gaypornstardocumentury i r s kan det lika grna vara den hr.

Blake P (nl) wrote: As light as a chocolate eclair, "La Doublure" is a French comedy that truly can be defined as a French comedy, considering it could never be taken seriously here in America. In the U.S.A., raunchy comedies have officially taken over; "La Doublure" reminds us that the French always remains classy, charming, and often times zany without being disgusting. Franois (Gad Elmaleh) is a mild-mannered valet that works for a ritzy restaurant with a beautiful view of the Eiffel Tower. But in his life, this is the majority of success. He proposes to his true love, Emilie (Virginie Ledoyen), and she turns him down. His parents worry about him constantly. Things quickly turn around when he has an accidental run-in with fame. As Franois is walking down the street one day, he just so happens to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Billionaire Pierre Lavasseur (Daniel Auteuil) and his mistress, supermodel Elena (Alice Taglioni), have a lover's spat, unaware that the paparazzi are lurking. Franois walks into the frame at the nick of time; when the tabloid comes out, Pierre's clever lawyer (Richard Berry) realizes the only way to avoid Pierre and his wife (Kristin Scott Thomas) getting a major divorce is to have Elena live with Franois, pretending they're a real couple to throw everybody off. It doesn't turn out as everyone would hope, however. Franois still longs for Emilie, and Emilie secretly feels the same, Elena is undecided on whether or not she wants to continue her relationship with Pierre, and Pierre's wife is much to intelligent to be fooled by the madcaps going on. By the end though, all will come to a tasty close. "La Doublure" could be accused of being too light; truly there are no real conflicts to get in the way of everything. But from beginning to end, it's easily enjoyable, in a way that settles your appetite for an hour-and-a-half but you soon forget just a week later. But is there really any harm in that? Francis Veber, one of France's most legendary comedy screenwriter's, directs the film with keen zip. It's hard to direct comedy, because if scenes drag or feel a bit too dramatic, things quickly can go downhill. Thanks to Veber's attentiveness, every second is bright, vibrant, and ultimately, funny. Elmaleh, in the meantime, is quite an unusual lead -- though not very attractive and not possessing much comedic timing, he manages to have a good helping of neuroses that makes the screen eat up his frustrations. Taglioni is sexy, but doesn't constantly feel the need to remind us, like Brigitte Bardot. Auteuil as usual, is good; Thomas is even better as the ultra-smart wife who can't be messed with. "La Doublure" is a filling French comedy that is wonderfully enjoyable. It may not be the funniest or best movie ever made, but it works.

Shalaka G (es) wrote: this movie is so hilarious! i'd see it over and over again!

Joey T (nl) wrote: Data's brother will replace Data from the end of the movie22%

Beto M (jp) wrote: No that bad, not that good adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's work. Looks a bit dated. The Dario Argento part is far better than George A. Romero.

Deborah M (nl) wrote: Well, that was not good. The sound quality was abysmal and the acting was, for the most part, below average. The plot involves six marginally likable college kids who respond to an ad to share expenses for Spring Break and make the idiotic decision to take a shortcut across the desert (with no phones or rescue assistance) to save time. Sigh. Predicable mayhem ensues. Without spoilers, the last line, preceded by several paragraphs of "I learned something today," was - I kid you not - "I dare not laugh at a mad man." Still, if you enjoy unintentional camp, I've seen worse.

Albertus A (au) wrote: Is it the most entertaining film? No. Is it a thought provoking film? Hell yes. Although most millennials wouldn't particularly enjoy this masterpiece, they should know that this might be the most influential film of all time. This film had cemented Orson Welles's legacy as a filmmaking legend.

EWC o (de) wrote: Actually has witty humor unlike most comedies

Michael Lee T (gb) wrote: A delirious multi-textured multi-character multi-plot film that revolves around drug-fuelled private investigator Larry 'Doc' Sportello in 1970s Los Angeles. This film is a unique blend of neo-noir, crime, comedy and drama making it a film that is hard to predict, hard to follow and surprising from start to finish. It's logic is hard to follow and as a viewer you become more engaged in the main character's emotions and his spiritual journey than the narrative structure of the film. The Plot is deliberately disjointed which may loose some audience members, but it's worth sticking around for the performances of the cast, the engaging cinematography and Paul Thomas Anderson's direction. Paul Thomas Anderson creates a thought-provoking and mesmerizing film with a distinctive atmosphere created through themes of paranoia and escapism. What stands out for me is the impressive dialogue and how it flows naturally with each conversation. Great writing, great direction and great performances from the main cast. In addition to this, Inherent Vice shows off a wide range of successful shots featuring a 'slow zoom' which makes each scene it's diploid in feel more personal, almost like you're there involved in the conversation yourself.It's a film left open to interpretation and my understanding is that it is a film about the emotions of the main character, not the events that occur and it's a film that's meant to be experienced, not understood.

Justin B (us) wrote: AN ultra disgusting, fit-for-Troma premise played pretty straight. Not anything too special but given how bad this could have been, it's impressive. Fun and entertaining.