Shutterbug

Shutterbug

When shooting the dawn one morning, photographer Alex Santiago looks into the rising sun and hurts his eyes. As a result, he begins to see spots and blurs. When the spots become a face - an apparition of a woman - he embarks on a journey to discover who she is.

When shooting the dawn one morning, photographer Alex Santiago looks into the rising sun and hurts his eyes. As a result, he begins to see spots and blurs. When the spots become a face - an... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

LinksNameQualitySeedersLeechersSize
Download   Shutterbug.2009.1080p.BluRay.x264-ROVERS1080p1011135.46 GB
Download   Shutterbug.2009.720p.BluRay.x264-ROVERS [PublicHD]BRRip34483.27 GB
Download   Shutterbug.2009.1080p.BluRay.x264-ROVERS [PublicHD]BRRip36344 GB

Shutterbug torrent reviews

Jack A (ag) wrote: This parody made with virtually no budget brings some laughs. Good netflix viewing if you want to chuckle at something ridiculous for an hour and haven't got much else to do.

Alberto M (mx) wrote: It's campy, cheesy, low-budget and totally forgeteable. The scene in wich the main guy have dinner with some dude and his girlfriend is so disgusting and plain stupid.

Daniel D (br) wrote: I could go 2 1/2 on this one, but I'll go 3 stars because one thing is true: authenticity is the best way to go when you want a girl's heart. And at least the movie makes that bit clear.

Logan M (us) wrote: Neither it or its predecessor are to be considered brilliant, but there's no doubt "Escape 2 Africa" is slightly superior.

Andrew L (ag) wrote: Funny when watching for the first time but anything more and this film becomes tedious and lame

Mattias E (de) wrote: Released in a politically very sensitive time, Ju Dou was initially banned in China and wasn't screened until 1992, three years after the Tiananmen Square Massacre. Although later denied by Zhang himself, the anti-authoritarian theme of Ju Dou, including an oft-debated silent demonstration of sympathy for the student protestors featuring Gong Li facing the camera directly as if appealing for help, makes it Zhang's most politically charged movie to date. It also introduces Zhang's symbolic use of colour to separate the different acts of the movie, later used in a more sensational manner in Hero and House Of Flying Daggers. Still, the main reason for Ju Dou's powerful impact is probably it's ageless melodrama and the moral questions it evokes in us.

John W (ag) wrote: King-Kong vs Robo-King-Kong. It's crap man-in-a-suit monster fight time, as Dr. Who (??!) hatches a plan to trick Kong into mining "Element X" for reasons that are never made quite clear. We do get a robotic Kong, and a very long fight sequence. Not as funny as "King Kong vs Godzilla" but worth a chuckle!

Matt H (fr) wrote: The first 15 minutes are magnetically filmed, great sequence. Really liked the movie in general, except I feel it lingers on Riva's past lover too much, and their lingering on her memory of it in particular.

Sean K (ca) wrote: Connery seems to be sleepwalking through most of the film bringing us a mediocre Bond flick that's sure to disappoint with its forgettable execution...

Byron B (it) wrote: This film is led by lots of strong women. I enjoyed the scenes with Alexandra Roach as young Margaret and Harry Lloyd as young Denis. Meryl Streep and Jim Broadbent are, of course, stunning as the mature couple. This isn't meant to be a history lesson. Instead I connected to the story because I have done some work with a non-profit serving people with forms of dementia and their families. Also my wife's grandma repeatedly said that she thought her husband was still present with her after he passed. The central thread of the story takes place near the end of Margaret Thatchers life with many flashbacks. Meryl Streep and the creative team have gotten a lot right in portraying what brain disease is like. Dementia does not discriminate between class or social/political power. This is a great snapshot of a contemporary political life.

Hannah M (ca) wrote: Based on a play, this is a compelling story with two distinct halves to it. The acting is not all that great, although Farrah Fawcett holds her own, but the dialogue is sharp and the story believable. I'd be interested in seeing a stage adaptation of it to see if a change in acting would push this from merely "pretty good" to "very good."