The Betrayal

The Betrayal

A naively honorable samurai (played by Raizo) comes to the bitter realization that his devotion to moral samurai principles makes him an oddity among his peers, and a very vulnerable oddity in consequence. He takes the blame for the misdeeds of others, with the understanding that he will be exiled for one year and restored to the clan's good graces after the political situation dies down. As betrayal begins to heap upon betrayal, he realizes he'll have to live out his life as a master-less ronin, if not hunted down and killed.

  • Rating:
    4.00 out of 5
  • Length:87 minutes
  • Release:1966
  • Language:Japanese
  • Reference:Imdb
  • Keywords:samurai era,  

A naively honorable samurai (played by Raizo) comes to the bitter realization that his devotion to moral samurai principles makes him an oddity among his peers, and a very vulnerable oddity in consequence. He takes the blame for the misdeeds of others, with the understanding that he will be exiled for one year and restored to the clan's good graces after the political situation dies down. As betrayal begins to heap upon betrayal, he realizes he'll have to live out his life as a master-less ronin, if not hunted down and killed. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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The Betrayal torrent reviews

Private U (es) wrote: Anna Tsuchiya is beautiful! Lovely colours, costumes and sets. I like this as a photobook rather than a movie. No wonder this film was composed by a photographer.

Roy B (nl) wrote: This movie had some funny moments, but some bad moments as well. I am a Chris Owen fan so he saved this movie a bit for me. The cover o this is decieving.

ren e (it) wrote: love the story and tandem

Casey C (us) wrote: A surprisingly above-average HK gangster flick. Writer-director Herman Yau returns to his infamous Category-III route and loaded his film with colorful profanities sorely lackluster in the like-minded genre these days. The cast are adequate, particularly Chapman To in his rare non-comedic performance as a foul-mouthed loose cannon gangster.

Sherry (us) wrote: More tails of the Bermuda Triangle;;

Stanley K (gb) wrote: Smug and self-satisfied and unentertaining

Gregory W (ag) wrote: skip this and see the original

Kevin N (jp) wrote: This film is indescribably rewatchable, and every time I see it I am more convinced that is is one of Hitchcock's best movies, at least from the beginning half of his career. This is his legendary cloak and dagger story, a film he would remake himself in 1956 to much more popular reception. This earlier telling has far less fireworks and relies on suspense built within character dynamics. Considering the magnitude of the conspiracy plot, the story is told with a very small number of places and people, and Hitch concentrates his creative energy on filling them with dark energy and humor. When I recall the movie, I recall it in close-up, and that's how the story is told. Hands, bullets, shards of glass, a small dog, gun metal, curtain wrinkles...these are the building blocks in which Hitch constructs a this suspense story. They are clear indicators of the director's style and sense of economic storytelling, and of all his films, one can see in this one most clearly the organizational approach Hitch took when preparing a film. No image in the movie is a compromise; what we have is seventy-five minutes of carefully ordered compositions that make up little stories, and these little stories make one great entertaining one. This is pure cinema- simple, effective cinema. And yet Hitchcock fills this simplicity with great wit and thrilling suspense. In the film's best scene, our hero finds the hideout of his daughter's kidnappers and, gunless, attacks them. Needing to keep the noise down, the kidnappers, led by a deliciously evil Peter Lorre, decide against firearms themselves, and a brawl involving flinging chairs begins. It is tense and hysterical at the same time, and it is entirely Hitchcockian. Anyone wishing to make films themselves, or even to watch films seriously, couldn't do more right than to start right here, where the greatest American director of all time lays down the foundation.