The Browning Version

The Browning Version

Andrew Crocker-Harris is an embittered and disliked teacher of Greek and Latin at a British prep school. After nearly 20 years of service, he is being forced to retire on the pretext of his health, and perhaps may not even be given a pension. The boys regard him as a Hitler, with some justification. His wife Laura is unfaithful, and lives to wound him any way she can. Andrew must come to terms with his failed life and regain at least his own self-respect.

Andrew Crocker-Harris is an embittered and disliked teacher of Greek and Latin at a British public school. After nearly 20 years of service, he is being forced to retire on the pretext of ... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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The Browning Version torrent reviews

Janice W (it) wrote: Vivian's intriguing photographs accented by her fascinating story.

Sanriel A (ru) wrote: Lourdes is a disomforting black comedy on faith and healing presented with superlative control and beautiful imagery. A perfectly restrained performance from Sylvie Testud adds to its charm. Must-see.

Dan S (ru) wrote: I'm sure there is a lot in there to reward a patient and attentive viewer but, apart from watching one of the great modern screen actors at work, I couldn't find it.

Michael M (nl) wrote: It's a shame Broken Lizard's first big movie was their best but you really have nowhere to go but down when you start with this classic. Still just as hilarious today as it was after college. Lines aplenty.

Justin I (it) wrote: YEAH! Christopher George plays a sweatpants wearing screaming coach that pushes a track star too far who dies after winning the big race. Soon after members of his track team start getting "offed" via implements of their favorite sports. Mmmmm. Mmmmmm. This baby is HIGHLY recommended. Also, Vanna White is in it who is also Christopher Georges niece. Directed by the great Herb Freed.

luke g (au) wrote: classic early take on terminator

Harry W (ca) wrote: Though Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014) was an extreme disappointment, I inexplicably found myself holding onto the hope that Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows would at least be somewhat better.Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows has the benefit of not having to be a pretentious backstory or waste time introducing its characters like its predecessor did, therefore not having to attempt at any dramatic grounding. Unfortunately, it still manages to follow the same route of poor production with only mild areas of improvement. The film opens with a series of shots depicting exactly what was wrong with the first film on a visual level: there is nothing high definition about what is happening. While the sight of the titular characters performing high octane stunts in CGI already has a predetermined limitation with its visual appeal, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows replicates every issue with its predecessor. There is minimal practicality about anything in the film as it is all animated stunts and fights, yet not in a good way. The characters fly past the screen at a frantic pace while the cinematography struggles to keep up with them. It's actively a challenge to understand what the characters are doing when they just blitz past the screen and jump all over the frame without it ever being clear just what they're doing. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows has the same technical issues of its predecessor.As far as writing goes, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows fails to offer anything innovative. The dialogue is just as juvenile as in the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, but the lame sense of humour seems even more tired the second time around. And the plot introduces a serious story element about the titular characters' facing the potential ability to change themselves into human beings as a throwaway plot point which does little more than bog the story down in tedious melodrama. The titular characters end up having less fun with themselves as a result. The message in the film may be mildly compelling to child viewers, but for everyone else it's the same tired tale of being proud of who you are despite being rejected by portions of society. Aside from that the main story is about the four brothers combatting a supervillain brain alien from commanding an interdimensional portal in what feels too much like a rip-off of The Avengers (2012). En route to this plot point is little more than a repetitive series of ninjas on the run and CGI creations of Dr. Moreau repeating the line "My man!" in a manner which will just make viewers think of how they could be spending this time watching Rick and Morty (2013-present) instead. Most of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows just serves to remind audiences of better films and television shows in one way or another, even if it does surpass its predecessor. The level of difference between Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows and its predecessor is like the way that Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) proved to be a better film than Fantastic Four (2005). The films have the same basic production flaws, but there are slightly less of them this time around which makes it slightly more tolerable without being enough to recommend.And with the standard for character development being lacklustre enough in the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the lacklustre character treatment continues on into this sequel. When Megan Fox first appears in a dishevelled blond wig that suggests she has just woken up with a hangover only to walk over to Tyler Perry who appears to be modelled after Sherman Klump from The Nutty Professor (1996), it's clear that characterization and casting has made little room for improvement. However, the major improvement that Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows makes over its predecessor is the fact that it downplays the presence of Megan Fox as April O'Neill. Given that out of everything wrong with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles it was the presence of Megan Fox that proved to be the absolute worst part, the fact that she is significantly downplayed this time around is certainly a reasonable decision on behalf of the filmmakers. Nevertheless, from the moment she enters the film in an unconvincing costume and with an even less convincing performance immediately. She is so unnecessary to the film's plot that it becomes easy to forget she was ever there in the first place, but the natural lack of charisma in Megan Fox makes it harder to forget. Even her fake smile is as unconvincing as her heavily cosmetic-altered face. Megan Fox doesn't have to do much to present herself as lacking in any film, but Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows proves how she can do it with only a few minutes of screen time.Luckily enough, someone saw fit to make the same improvement with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows that Transformers: Age of Extinction (2014) made over its predecessors with an all-new protagonist. The major human character in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows is Casey Jones, played by TV star Stephen Amell to some really solid results. Stephen Amell is the one really solid cast member in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows. Bringing in the same natural charisma that made him a hit portraying Oliver Queen in the television series Arrow (2012-present), Stephen Amell performs very well as Casey Jones. While everyone around him takes on the material with a lame and pretentious sense of humour, Stephen Amell actually manages to walk an ideal line between being serious and working the comedic intentions of the story with a natural flow to him. He presents himself with a very strong-willed determination that gives the character ambition, and he channels this into his physical energy during the action scenes. Stephen Amell kicks plenty of ass in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows and stands out as the one character who is consistently likable and lacking in any pretentious nature. If nothing else, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows proves that Stephen Amell maintains dedication and charisma in the face of any screenplay he is presented with.Will Arnett still has the same nature about him which should amuse some of his fans, though many others will conclude that he deserves far better material. And Tyler Perry isn't that bad, but it's hard to tell whether or not we are meant to take his character seriously due to inconsistencies with the screenplay. But as far as disappointing characters go, it's actually the titular heroes that are the real letdown. Disregarding the obvious shortage of characterization and lame sense of humour to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, in the first film it actually seemed like they were having a fun time and the actors had some good energy about them. With Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows implementing in story elements about the characters questioning their identity and need to remain hidden from public view, the characters have to act far more serious this time around. As a result, it just isn't that fun. On top of all that, Johnny Knoxville didn't return to voice Leonardo in this one which makes the character far less amusing.Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows continues with the overtly juvenile humour and lacklustre CGI treatment that ruined its predecessor with a mild improvement through the presence of Stephen Amell.