The Charge of the Light Brigade

The Charge of the Light Brigade

A chronicle of events that led to the British involvement in the Crimean War against Russia and which led to the siege of Sevastopol and the fierce Battle of Balaclava on October 25, 1854 which climaxed with the heroic, but near-disastrous calvary charge made by the British Light Brigade against a Russian artillery battery in a small valley which resulted in the near-destruction of the brigade due to error of judgement and rash planning on part by the inept British commanders.

A chronicle of events that led to the British involvement in the Crimean War against Russia and which led to the siege of Sevastopol and the fierce Battle of Balaclava on October 25, 1854 ... . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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The Charge of the Light Brigade torrent reviews

Joe A (us) wrote: From the son of horror legend George Romero comes a competent and sometimes gruesome horror tale of a group of young hikers finding themselves in the barn of a sadistic and twisted backwoods family. The story is nothing new but it is a well made low budgeter and if you are a fan of this horror sub-genre you could do worse.

Meirion H (es) wrote: Not as funny as it could've been, but raises the occasional smile.Nice performances, genuinely touching in moments

Jeremy F (ru) wrote: I really enjoyed this movie, the drug dealer was a crack up!

Dexter D (mx) wrote: The first 30 or so minutes were rather predictable, it's a film about smuggling drugs so someone has to OD on said drugs. After that it got more interesting and unexpected. Alan Tudyk was great. Towards the end some parts were easily predicted while others were genuine surprises. But man talk about a bleak movie it just all about how a few wrong decisions screw up not only your life but the lives of those around you. No one comes out a winner in the end not the bad ones, not the oblivious ones, not even the ones with good intentions.

Leonard D (mx) wrote: Thank God I was never a Frankie Muniz fan in the first place. Giving him and Amanda Bynes chemistry, makes as much sense as the relationship between Squirrel and Doyle from Biodome. Just makes you want to scream with annoyance!

Van R (mx) wrote: Frank Sinatra does his best Errol Flynn imitation in director John Sturges?? ??Never So Few,?? an uneven blend of romance and combat set against the exotic backdrop of the China-Burma-India Theater of war. Sinatra sports a goatee throughout the first quarter hour or so before he shaves it off. When Sturges and scenarist Millard Kaufmann, who collaborated on BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK, are not shoe-horning into the narrative an unconvincing and superfluous romance between Italian cheese cake Gina Lollobrigida and Sinatra, they tackle the racial intolerance shown toward Kachin resistance warriors by the unfeeling U.S. Army. The Air Force keeps dropping medical supplies in without enough chutes so the morphine supplies shatter on impact and the Allied hospitals feed these tribes people food calculated to cause dysentery rather than stimulate their healing. NEVER SO FEW is one of those rare movies about the warfare in Asia with THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI and OBJECTIVE BURMA as the other two major films. NEVER SO FEW is unquestionably too ambitious for its own good. Sturges and Kaufmann have our war-weary protagonist perform a mercy killing on one of his men Frank Sinatra does his best Errol Flynn imitation in the John Sturges film NEVER SO FEW, an uneven blend of romance and combat set against the exotic backdrop of the China-Burma-India Theater of war. Sinatra sports a goatee throughout the first quarter hour or so before he shaves it off. The Air Force keeps dropping medical supplies in without enough chutes so the morphine supplies shatter on impact and the Allied hospitals feed these tribes people food calculated to cause dysentery rather than stimulate their healing. Indeed, the film is loosely based on actual events. NEVER SO FEW is unquestionably too ambitious for its own good. Sturges and Kaufmann have our war-weary protagonist Tom Reynolds (Oscar winner Frank Sinatra of FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, perform a mercy killing on one of his men despite the protests of his colleagues. Later, after several big battle scenes, our heroes cross over into China and wipe out Chinese mercenaries paid by the Chungking government to kill American servicemen. If this plot summary doesn??t whet your appetite, then you should know that future superstars Steve McQueen and Charles Bronson flesh out of the cast. NEVER SO FEW ranked as McQueen??s first big film, while Bronson turns in another solid supporting performance as a Navajo Indian radio translator, long before John Woo made WINDTALKERS about the Navajo contribution to World War II. Sturges stages the battle scenes with his usual aplomb and the widescreen Panavision lens of cinematographer William H. Daniels, who lensed BRUTE FORCE and THE NAKED CITY, add to the spectacle. The cast is padded with lots of familiar Hollywood actors, including Robert Bray, John Hoyt, Peter Lawford, Richard Johnson, Dean Jones, Paul Henreid of CASABLANCA, Brian Donlevy, and Whit Bissell. Basically, the action alternates between the jungle and behind Allied lines as our heroes take the time to chill out, get drunk, fight, and upset their superiors. The same can be said about the production. Some scenes were lensed on location while others take place on an MGM soundstage. NEVER SO FEW is one of Sinatra??s early forays into an all-action white-knuckler and Ole Blue Eyes wields a .45 caliber Thompson submachine gun and a British Sten gun. Happily, Frank does not warble any tunes. McQueen survives the fray, but Bronson and Johnson both bite the bullet. Sturges and Kaufmann depict World War II as--an unprecedented war, despite the protests of his colleagues. Later, after several big battle scenes, our heroes cross over into China and wipe out Chinese mercenaries paid by the Chungking government to kill American servicemen. Essentially, NEVER SO FEW opens with a bang and ends with a bang!

Lir C (fr) wrote: i was perfectly entertained so much funny and inspiring movie

Daniel K (br) wrote: 1.5: The opening sequence, which is essentially a historical recap outlining the extreme differences between the eastern and western United States at the turn of the century, is a nice touch. This is definitely not something most Westerns include, with a voiceover even, as well as historical footage and photographs. It's a very atypical western opening, but it does manage to correctly orient us temporally and geographically, even if it is a bit abrupt and inelegant. I should have realized this didn't bode well for the films effectiveness. The lighting is awful as well, at least for the indoor scenes. It makes everything seem incredibly artificial. The supposedly evil bunch of villains seems ridiculous as well, especially when compared to the killers in films like The Wild Bunch or Once Upon a Time in the West. I believed that Henry Fonda was a vicious killer, but these guys seem to just be bad actors. The picture starts to work a bit once Wayne appears and the scene between Wayne and O'Hara certainly isn't bad either, but its merely a tantalizing taste of the on-screen fireworks exhibited in far, far, far greater films like The Quiet Man. This just seemed like a pitiful attempt to make a violent Western while still keeping things sanitized and close to or within the now defunct production code. It also tries way too hard to make things modern and hip. A big disappointment on basically every level. It is likely the worst Wayne Western I've ever seen.

Becca A (it) wrote: They used to tank cod from Alaska all the way to China. They'd keep them in vats in the ship. By the time the codfish reached China, the flesh was mush and tasteless. So this guy came up with the idea that if you put these cods in these big vats, put some catfish in with them and the catfish will keep the cod agile. And there are those people who are catfish in life. And they keep you on your toes. They keep you guessing, they keep you thinking, they keep you fresh. And I thank god for the catfish because we would be droll, boring and dull if we didn't have somebody nipping at our fin.