The Furious Gods: Making Prometheus

The Furious Gods: Making Prometheus

An in-depth documentary on the making of Ridley Scott's "Prometheus," featuring cast and crew interviews, outtakes and behind-the-scenes footage. Released on the 4-disc Collector's Edition Blu-ray set.

An in-depth documentary on the making of Ridley Scott's "Prometheus," featuring cast and crew interviews, outtakes and behind-the-scenes footage. Released on the 4-disc Collector's Edition Blu-ray set. . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

LinksNameQualitySeedersLeechers

The Furious Gods: Making Prometheus torrent reviews

Gerard D (jp) wrote: A no-nonsense action flick. Kevin Sorbo shoots some bad drug dealers in Texas this time around. And he wastes no bullets.

Jeremy C (gb) wrote: While the film had a few funny moments, lively animation, and a fun premise, it was ultimatley dragged down by forced, unnecessarily vulgar jokes and generic family movie cliches with not enough substance to make it anything particularily unforgettable.

David P (it) wrote: second best movie ive ever seen

Addie S (nl) wrote: scottish films warm my heart..especially this one...amazing film with good narration, scenes,etc. and incredibly depressing in terms of the main character. i couldn't stop watching, listening to the tale and the revelations held by "frankie"

Andrew P (de) wrote: all i can really say its very intresting

Tawsif R (br) wrote: a really funny movie though its pretty old.......i liked it

Adrian Z (br) wrote: 3 - A mother and daughter in feudal Japan are raped and murdered by samurai during the 3-year absence of the husband who is off fighting wars. They return as ghosts who seek to kill samurai, but don't count on the return of the husband, who has now become a samurai, and has been ordered to put an end to them. This is a uniquely tragic premise, that leads to some great dramatic and romantic moments later on. Before they arrive, one has to endure a rather slow start. Kiwako Taichi's performance as the daughter in law is understated but heartachingly effective. On a technical level, stark B&W photography adds to the creepy atmosphere, but the dated editing techniques (even for the time) are distracting, and even bring the film down half a notch.

Scott R (br) wrote: Pretty bad, but had to see it for zsa zsa.

Manny C (ag) wrote: It's not hard to imagine working for a music magazine in a world where print is dying off in favor of digital. That's the world of Lucky Them, in which Ellie Klug (Toni Collette), a rock critic for a rag in Seattle called Stax, must figure out a way to survive professionally. Her editor (Oliver Platt) thinks one big story could ebb the tide of print going extinct and so he wants Ellie to dig into the disappearance of Matthew Smith, who went off the radar a decade ago. Smith is also Ellie's ex lover in addition to a rock idol. Ellie, weary of younger men doing wrong by her, would prefer to disappear herself.But instead she goes on the road with Charlie (Thomas Haden Church),a dot-com-tycoon-turned-documentarian who is also searching for Matthew. Haden Church imbues the film with a bouyant kick, and he and Collette make a terrific pairing.Lucky Them is full of comic verve and sexual energy but it's a film of shocking gravity. Journalist Emily Wachtel, who wrote the script with Huck Botko, is clearly coming from somewhere personal, and director Megan Griffiths (Eden) complements her beautifully, as does exec producer Joanne Woodward and star Collette. When Ellie does end up finding Matthew (no fair spoiling what star plays him), it's a window into music's vibrant past and uncertain future. For Ellie, it's her finally finding strength in broken places.