The Stranger Within a Woman

The Stranger Within a Woman

Tashiro (Keiju Kobayashi) coincidentally meets his best friend Sugimoto (Tatsuya Mihashi) in a bar very close to the apartment in which Sugimoto’s wayward wife is found dead. Although Tashiro is not a suspect in the police investigation, he is racked with guilt and confesses to his wife, Masako (Michiyo Aratama). In an effort to further relieve his tortured sense of guilt, he then confesses to Sugimoto. Neither his wife nor his friend can believe that he could have been involved. —Catherine Russell

Tashiro (Keiju Kobayashi) coincidentally meets his best friend Sugimoto (Tatsuya Mihashi) in a bar very close to the apartment in which Sugimoto’s wayward wife is found dead. Although Tashiro is not a suspect in the police investigation, he is racked with guilt and confesses to his wife, Masako (Michiyo Aratama). In an effort to further relieve his tortured sense of guilt, he then confesses to Sugimoto. Neither his wife nor his friend can believe that he could have been involved. —Catherine Russell . You can read more in Google, Youtube, Wiki

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The Stranger Within a Woman torrent reviews

Joe R (ca) wrote: The women are the only thing the film has going for it. Everything else is awful.

Carlos G (au) wrote: It's like traffic multiple lives cross paths and fit in this great film.

Harry G (fr) wrote: It is an excellent film, which probably suffered unfairly at the hands of the critics and cinema-goers because it turned out not to be 'Saving Private Ryan in the Pacific'. Instead it is an honest personal attempt to understand the motivations and actions behind not only 'that' photograph, but war as a whole. It also underlines the darker side of not only the war in the Pacific, but the manufacture of 'heroes', the treatment of veterans, and cynical exploitation of fame and horrific circumstances. Production-wise Phillipe and Beach both deliver incredibly strong performances, equalled by the superb cinematography which gives one an easy understanding of the scale and geography of the combat without breaking jarringly from the story. Indeed the smoothness of the narrative, even as it jumps in time and space over decades and thousands of miles, is testament to how good this film and Eastwood's direction are. It would be the best film made about the Pacific War in at least the last decade if it weren't for its even better companion piece, Letters from Iwo Jima.

Samantha B (us) wrote: Having just gotten breast implants it was good to learn about the birth of them :)

Glorimar S (ca) wrote: Really nice and lovely singing!!! <3

Wayne F (ag) wrote: Not so much kickboxing as there is shooting to be honest. Not as good as the previous 2 movies but still more watchable than a lot of others

Ethan P (fr) wrote: The explosive chemistry between Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell is reason enough to watch this satirical and tense film about the ridiculous world of journalism and reporters quest to get a story on a murderers escape from prison. Russell's performance is especially fantastic.

Ed D (es) wrote: First things first, this has a great opening scene. I wasn't overly enthusiastic about this sequel, partly because 28 Days Later director Danny Boyle wasn't at the helm (an executive producer instead), but when the first scene got going, it had me ready for 90 minutes of bloody carnage. This is much more disturbing than the first, containing one scene that genuinely creeped out even myself. It's in part to a theme of family, and the disintegration of that family by the virus. Cilian Muprhy in the first film found himself alone and looking for survivors, in this one we get an established family torn apart in a cruelly sadistic fashion. I bloody hate the kids in this, so there's not much sympathy involved for their characters, but the amount they have to go through is unlucky to say the least, so you do owe it to yourself to wish them the best. As with the first film, the threat isn't just the Rage victims, it's also the military. A metaphor for the Iraq war? Probably, as the soldiers begin to kill on sight everything that moves without hesitation, including civilians and even their own men. The way this film is shot adds to the chilling atmosphere. It's done in a way that allows the darkness of London to stand out in a much better manner than the first film, creating a post-apocalyptic terrain for the predators and their prey to scurry through, all the while being chased by flames. From the outset, Robert Carlyle heads up the cast, although things take a trick turn to spice up the adventure. From this first twist, we become aware that the plot isn't so contrived as it could have been under the "curse-of-the-sequel" They could just have easily started the Virus up again with another test tube smash, but instead the writers opt for a more complex approach that plays into a conflict already established from the film's first few scenes. I would however be lying if I said things didn't get far fetched. Of course, you should suspend your disbelief for a film like this, but I'm not even referring to the spectacular bombing of London or the ridiculous skewering of zombies by a helicopter blade (which did make me groan) The part which didn't seem believable was on a much more grounded level, it concerned one particular character that kept conveniently showing up in order to further the story. It was entirely necessary but felt entirely forced at the same time. Still, I have to give this film credit for being genuinely unsettling in places and making me wish I hadn't spent a tenner on Chinese food. I'm not saying it's really that scary; just it puts in a lot more effort than most box office horror films, declaring itself a success in a genre full of post-modern-slasher-comedy-torture-porn failures. Instead of adopting the same approach as the first film, it just lets loose with the mayhem and keeps inventing new tricks to ensure its runtime is one big panic attack. You may get slightly bored when the film slows to allow you to catch breath, and the peformances are only semi-bearable, but otherwise this is a surprisingly decent sequel that uses tricks of sight and sound to make London an even more desolate and threatening place than before. It's not empty anymore, that's for sure. The ending implies another film, but I'm not worried just yet. Danny Boyle has revealed he's returning to the director's seat for the third outing - with that knowledge I'm fully confident he can pull off something original and end the franchise on a satisfying note. With Romero's Diary of the Dead supposedly angering critics in the film festivals, I think it's time to name Danny Boyle the new master of the zombie genre.

Jorge B (mx) wrote: Great! it details the work of the bravest men in the world.

Chris D (jp) wrote: Another great film from the remarkably twisted mind of Mr. Hitchcock: the scenes with Mrs. Blaney and Rusk are absolutely horrifying...it was fun to see a British film, after many American pictures by Hitchcock. There is a certain, dry humor to Great Britain that is not as potent in the U.S, and it really comes out in this film. Very disturbing...and infuriating. Hitchcock shows, yet again, that psychopathy andd sociopathy are difficult to discern and can manifest themselves in the most unusual ways (see: head detective's wife...possibly the most misaligned person in the film)

Wesley G (ca) wrote: Interesting, loose plot, and at some points you wonder what exactly is going on. It did manage to come together in the end.